If You Really Want to Be a Closer

first_imgThe real close when you make a complex sale doesn’t occur when your prospect signs the contract and through all your effort becomes a client. The real commitment you need to gain only starts when your dream client signed your contract. The real close is gaining their commitment to change and to execute.You’ve been here. You’ve sold your prospect the solution they need. They’ve agreed to make the changes necessary on their end. But then, you begin to execute only to find out that your new client is unwilling to change what they need to change. This even after you had a half-dozen conversations about how their processes and procedures would need to change.The real close you need is gaining the commitments to go to war inside their own organization and insist on execution from the stakeholders that supported you. Closing the deal all the way means going back into your customer’s company and working with the stakeholders who are dragging their feet (or digging in their heels, if you will forgive back to back metaphors) to get the commitment to make changes.These aren’t easy commitments to gain. Everyone wants the better results without having to fundamentally change what they are doing. This is why the incumbent failed. This is why your new client has changed partners three times and why they believe that changing again will give them better results. No one has been able–or willing–to push them for the real commitment they need.Execution is messy. It’s political. It pisses people off. Before it produces the results they need. If you really want to be a closer, you will make the final close and gain the agreement to change what needs changing. Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

How to Become a Professional

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now The professional doesn’t believe that the time they spend in their chosen endeavor isn’t what makes them a professional. They know that there are others who have worked in their field for years—or decades—who are still not professionals. K. Anders Ericsson’s research on expertise doesn’t suggest that you become an expert in 10,000 hours. It states that you need 10,000 hours of deliberate practice, something very different from going through the motions without the intention of improving.Start with the intention to improve what you do, no matter how well you presently do things, and no matter how successful you are now.The professional continues to learn, to make new distinctions, to uncover new ideas and subtleties. The read books and articles from their field, or they listen to them on audio. They take courses and continue their education, working to discover new ideas, new choices, and new ways to do things. The professional believes there is more knowledge to uncover.Develop a personal and professional development plan that provides you with continuous education and continual growth.One of the defining characteristic of the professional is their preparation, their routines. They follow a pattern, or a system, or a process in preparing for what they do as a way to ensure successful outcomes. The professional doesn’t “wing it” or “fly by the seat of their pants.” The reason they are able to effectively improvise when necessary is because they have done the work to prepare, including knowing their outcome.Prepare and plan the work you do to ensure the outcomes are the best you are capable of producing and that allow you to adjust and improvise.There is value in reviewing your own performance, assessing what is working, what isn’t working, and what might need to change to produce better results. The professional recognizes when something isn’t working or when an approach has lost its effectiveness. They are critical of their own work and methods, which is what allows them to seek new ideas, new answers, and new approaches. The willingness to let go of what they believe and adopt new ones is how the professional gets better.Assess yourself, your beliefs, your approach, and your methods, taking in new beliefs, trying new strategies, and shoring up any deficiencies in your approach.A true professional holds themselves accountable for producing the highest quality outcomes. They raise the bar because they believe they are capable of improving their work and the outcomes they produce. The standard they hold isn’t an external standard or the industry standard. They don’t hold themselves to what another entity requires or “best practices.” The standard they set for themselves is internal, exceeding any external expectation.Raise your own personal standard for the work you do and the outcomes you produce.last_img read more

How To Scale the Unscalable

first_imgCaring is difficult to scale. Every interaction—both internally and externally—requires greater intention, attention, and energy. Because so much of this depends on the individuals, many believe it doesn’t scale. Organizational caring isn’t a thing.Initiative is equally difficult to scale. The idea that a person would decide for themselves what needs done and take action before being asked isn’t something that is easily accomplished. Because it is difficult, few try to be proactive as an organization.Resourcefulness, harnessing the creative powers and imagination, if put to work in an organization would likely allow that group of people to outperform their competitors by the widest of margins. Most would never even consider this a goal.This may be the first time the words “organizational” and “respect” have been combined. The idea that everyone in an organization would respect all they come in contact with within their organization as well as with those on the outside isn’t something one thinks of scaling. When something is individual, it is perceived as being something that applies to groups—especially large groups.The idea that these things don’t scale is incorrect. In every case, they scale perfectly well, even if the work involved takes time and energy and effort. Any attribute or value or virtue can scale, and when one of these things scale, the word we use to describe it is “culture.” When a large group of people all believe and act in accordance with a set of values or virtues, you have proof positive that the “soft” stuff that makes any enterprise truly special does indeed scale.Unfortunately, there are more harmful things that also scale. Scarcity thinking can also spread to become how the enterprise views the world. Victimhood, the idea that the world is working on you without your ability to create a positive future, is easily spread amongst a population, as do negativity, skepticism, cynicism, and negativity. At the heart of each of these beliefs is fear.If you want to scale your business, the first thing you should scale is the things that most people don’t believe lend themselves to being scaled. When you scale the attributes and virtues and values that build a culture that is positive, optimistic, future-oriented, and empowered, your business will scale on its own power. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Jats to call off stir, claims Haryana government

first_imgLeaders of the Jat community have agreed to call off their 48-day protest in various parts of the State over demands for reservation, the Haryana government claimed on Friday.The protest is called off just days ahead of massive rally planned by the community to lay siege to the national capital.Announcing the end of protests by Jats, Cabinet Minister Ram Bilas Sharma said that the State government has agreed to accept the seven demands of the community, including putting the issue of reservation in the ninth schedule of the Constitution, till High Court gives its verdict on it.“Jats, who are members of our big family have agreed to call off their agitation. The decision was taken after the meeting at Panipat yesterday. It was attended by all major khaps of Jat community. The State government has also accepted their seven demands,” Mr. Sharma told reporters here.However, the All-India Jat Aarakshan Sangarsh Samiti (AIJASS) leader Yashpal Malik was not present at the press conference when this announcement was made.Mr. Malik was scheduled to be present at the conference along with Haryana Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar.Talking about the agreement between the two, Mr. Sharma added that the government had agreed to give jobs to family members of those killed during the agitation within 60 days. “Cases against all youth from the community who are in jails will also be reinvestigated,” he added.Yesterday, the Sharma-led high level committee had met Jat leaders in Panipat to end the agitation by the community.The Haryana government had constituted a high-level three-member committee under the chairmanship of Sharma for holding talks on the Jat reservation issue.Two other members include minister of state for social justice and empowerment Krishan Kumar Bedi and chief parliamentary secretary Kamal Gupta.AIJASS which is spearheading the Jat quota stir, had given a call for the march to Delhi on March 20 to besiege Parliament and to hold dharnas on the Delhi border blocking all highways, to press for their demands for reservation.last_img read more

Ram Madhav to the aid of Mehbooba

first_imgBJP general secretary Ram Madhav on Wednesday came to the defence of his party’s coalition partner PDP in Jammu and Kashmir and its supremo, Chief Minister Mehbooba Mufti, who was targeted by the Opposition leaders over Tuesday’s incident, when a function attended by Ms. Mufti ended abruptly, ostensibly following protests.While Mr. Madhav did not name National Conference leader Omar Abdullah, he seemed to be referring to his tweets about the incident. “When I saw his [an apparent reference to Mr. Abdullah] statements, it suggested that the lady [Ms. Mufti] was lying about the reasons for the function being disrupted, that there were anti-India protests… if this is the kind of politics that is practiced, it is tantamount to weakening nation’s foundation,” he said.last_img

Gurdaspur bypoll witnesses 56% turnout

first_imgPunjab’s Gurdaspur Parliamentary by-election saw 56% voter turnout on Wednesday with minor incident of clash between workers of the Congress and the BJP-Akali Dal. The polling percentage in Gurdaspur constituency during the 2014 parliamentary election was 70.03%, according to an electoral official.“By-election to Gurdaspur parliamentary constituency concluded on Wednesday peacefully with the total voting percentage recorded at 56%,” said Punjab’s Chief Electoral Officer, V.K. Singh. “Polling across the State was peaceful. Dera baba Nanak Assembly constituency registered highest voting percentage of 65% while the Batala Assembly constituency saw lowest voting percentage of 50%,” he said.Gurdaspur parliamentary seat fell vacant after the demise of Member of Parliament Vinod Khanna in April this year.The election witnessed a triangular fight between Sunil Jakhar of the Congress, Swarn Salaria of the BJP and Major General (retd) Suresh Khajuria of the Aam Aadmi Party.Police said a minor scuffle between Akali Dal and Congress workers was reported from Pahra village in which at least five Akali workers was injured.Senior SAD leader Dr. Daljit Cheema alleged that Congress workers attacked Akali Dal workers in Pahra village and no FIR has been registered yet. AAP candidate also alleged that Congress polling agents were trying to influence voters inside a polling booth in Sujanpur. A complaint in this regard was filed with the Election Commission. Counting of votes would take place on October 15 and results would be announced the same day.last_img read more

Republic Day: Mobile internet services snapped in Kashmir

first_imgMobile internet services have been snapped in Kashmir as a precautionary measure on the occasion of the Republic Day, officials said on Friday.The internet services on mobile phones and data cards were suspended on Thursday as part of the security drill for Republic Day.Although, it’s normal practice in Kashmir to suspend the internet services on the Republic Day and Independence Day, this is the first time that these services were withdrawn a day earlier.Security forces have been deployed in strength at strategic locations in the city.The law enforcing agencies are carrying out random frisking and searches of vehicles entering the city.This year the main Republic Day function will be held at Sher-e-Kashmir Cricket Stadium instead of the regular venue — Bakshi Stadium.The area around the cricket stadium was sealed on Wednesday for full dress rehearsal of the Republic Day Parade.Traffic police has issued an advisory for movement of vehicles between the city centre and south Kashmir and no vehicle will be permitted to move along the Ram Munshi Bagh-TRC stretch of the road during the rehearsal and Republic Day function.last_img read more

Vasco MLA suffers stroke, hospitalised

first_imgPanaji: BJP MLA Carlos Almeida was admitted to a private hospital on Thursday after he suffered a minor stroke.Shekhar Salkar, senior doctor at Manipal Hospital, said Mr. Almeida’s condition was stable. The MLA from Vasco da Gama had complained of chest pain before falling unconscious at his residence. Goa BJP spokesperson Sidharth Kuncalienkar said in a press release, “[Mr. Almeida] is under observation.”last_img

Judgment in Asaram’s case to be pronounced in jail

first_imgA special SC/ST court will pronounce its judgment in the rape case against self-styled godman Asaram Bapu in the Jodhpur Central Jail, where he is lodged, on April 25. The Rajasthan High Court directed the special court here on Tuesday to deliver the verdict in the jail, while accepting the State government’s plea.The State government and the Jodhpur Police had moved the High Court seeking directions for pronouncement of the judgment in the jail premises in order to avoid violence and disturbance. The police had apprehended that a large number of Asaram’s followers would gather in the city and indulge in violence and create law and order problems.The High Court’s Division Bench, comprising Justices Gopal Krishna Vyas and R.S. Jhala, also directed the Police Commissioner and district administration to make necessary arrangements and ensure that “no inconvenience or hurdle” was created by Asaram’s followers in the city. The Jail Superintendent was directed to make arrangements for delivery of the verdict.Additional Advocate-General Shiv Kumar Vyas told the court that intelligence reports had indicated to the possibility of thousands of Asaram’s followers from different parts of the country gathering on the District Courts premises on April 25. “There is a serious apprehension about loss of human lives and property by violence,” he said.The court directed that adequate police force be deployed to maintain law and order in the city. “Police authorities will be at liberty to take appropriate action to restrict the followers near the Central Jail strictly in accordance with law,” stated the Bench.The special SC/ST (prevention of atrocities) court had completed the hearing of final arguments on April 7 and reserved the judgment. The case against Asaram pertains to allegations of rape levelled by a minor girl in 2013. The alleged victim, belonging to Shahjahanpur in Uttar Pradesh, was staying at Asaram’s ashram in Manai village near Jodhpur.Asaram, who has been serving time in prison since September 1, 2013, has been denied bail several times.last_img read more

Modi to lay foundation of Purvanchal Expressway

first_imgWith eyes set on the 2019 Lok Sabha elections, Prime Minister Narendra Modi will on Saturday embark on a two-day tour of eastern Uttar Pradesh, where he will inaugurate and lay the foundation for several key projects, prime among them the Purvanchal Expressway.Mr. Modi will visit Azamgarh, Mirzapur and his parliamentary constituency Varanasi during the tour. In Azamgarh, he will lay the foundation stone of the 340-km-long Purvanchal Expressway, stretching from the State capital to Ghazipur on the eastern fringes bordering Bihar.The six-lane road will pass through Barabanki, Faizabad, Ambedkarnagar, Amethi, Sultanpur, Azamgarh and Mau before ending in Ghazipur. The expressway is to be linked with Varanasi through a separate link road, said the Uttar Pradesh Expressways Industrial Development Authority. The State expects to complete the project, dubbed by it as the longest expressway in the country, by 2021.Earlier this week, the State Cabinet approved the various proposals submitted by the shortlisted builders for the difference packages of the expressway. It is being built through the EPC (engineering, procurement and construction) model.Like the 302-km-long Lucknow-Agra Expressway, the Purvanchal Expressway will also feature an airstrip for emergency landing of fighter planes — near Sultanpur district. “The Purvanchal Expressway will be the lifeline of development in east U.P.,” said Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath. Once completed, the expressway would reduce travel time from Purvanchal to Delhi via the Lucknow-Agra Expressway and the Yamuna Expressway.Lost ground While the expressway extends from Lucknow to Ghazipur, the BJP government’s decision to lay the foundation stone in Azamgarh is being viewed with curiosity as it is the Lok Sabha seat of Samajwadi Party patriarch Mulayam Singh Yadav. With Mr. Yadav making it clear that he would contest the next poll from his traditional seat Mainpuri, the BJP is working to regain lost ground in Azamgarh, which is among the three main centres of east U.P. along with Varanasi and Gorakhpur.In Varanasi, Mr. Modi will dedicate or lay the foundation stone of important projects with a total worth over ₹900 crore, the Prime Minister’s Office said. These would include the Varanasi City Gas Distribution Project, Varanasi-Ballia EMU train, International Convention Centre, the Panch Koshi Parikrama Marg, and several projects under the Smart Cities Mission and Namami Gange. On Sunday, Mr. Modi will dedicate to the nation the Bansagar Canal Project, a bridge over the Ganga in Chunar and a medical college, all in Mirzapur district.Mr. Modi’s visit will come amid heightened activity of the BJP in U.P. with the 2019 polls in mind. While last month, Mr. Modi laid the foundation of an academy dedicated to Sant Kabir in Maghar, on July 21 he is expected to address a farmers rally in Shahjahanpur district.last_img read more

Man booked for giving triple talaq to wife over phone

first_imgPolice have registered a case in Bahraich against a man for allegedly giving triple talaq to his wife over phone over the dowry issue. The man currently lives in Saudi Arabia, police said on Thursday.“Chandbabu pronounced triple talaq (divorce) thrice to his wife Noori, 20, over phone on September 10 when her family members did not fulfill his dowry demand,” Superintendent of Police Sabharaj said. An FIR in this connection was registered against Chandbabu, his mother and sister on the complaint of the victim’s family at Ruphaideeha police station on Wednesday, he said. Noori’s family alleged that after the talaq, her mother-in-law and sister-in-law forced her to leave the house and also threatened her, he said. They alleged that the accused was demanding Rs 50,000 and a motorcycle as dowry, the SP said. Police said they were probing the matter. The government had recently passed the Muslim Women (Protection of Rights on Marriage) Ordinance, 2018, which makes triple talaq an offence and can invite a jail term of three years. The Supreme Court had on August 22 last year struck down triple talaq, calling the practice unconstitutional and in violation of Article 14 of the Constitution, which provides for equality before the law.last_img read more

Teachers strip girls to check for sanitary pads, Punjab CM orders inquiry

first_imgSome students at a government girls’ school in Punjab’s Fazilka district were allegedly stripped by teachers to check which one of them was wearing a sanitary pad, after one was found discarded in the school toilet.A video clip showed some girls crying and complaining that teachers stripped them on the premises of their school in Kundal village three days back.Two teachers were transferred and an inquiry ordered after the matter was brought to the notice of Punjab Chief Minister Amarinder Singh, an official spokesperson said on Saturday.The teachers were trying to find out which of the girls was wearing a sanitary napkin, after one was found in the school toilet, officials said. Instead, they said, the teachers should have educated the students on proper disposal of sanitary napkins.The Chief Minister directed Education Secretary Krishan Kumar to complete the investigation by Monday and take further action as necessary.The district education officer was asked to visit the school, and on questioning the students and their parents found prima facie evidence of the involvement of the two teachers.A government spokesperson said further disciplinary action, according to rules, will be taken after the students’ statements are recorded and the inquiry report received. CM Amarinder Singh asked the Education Secretary to personally monitor the investigation and update him with the final report on Monday.last_img read more

Inmate’s death: prison officials suspended

first_imgThe Rajasthan government on Thursday removed the Jaipur Central Jail Superintendent and a deputy jailor from duty and placed two other prison officials under suspension following the alleged murder of a Pakistani convict, Shakir Ullah, in a prison cell on Wednesday. A case of murder has been registered against four jail inmates.Shakir Ullah, 50, hailing from Pakistan’s Sialkot, was serving life sentence in the Central Jail here after his conviction under the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act in 2017. He was brought here in 2011 from a Punjab jail, where he was incarcerated as a member of terror outfit Lashkar-e-Taiba. He was allegedly killed in a brawl with other inmates.A case was registered at Lal Kothi police station here against the accused – Kulwinder Singh, Manoj Pratap, Bhajan Meena and Ajit Singh – and the Pakistan High Commission in New Delhi was informed. Inspector-General of Prisons Rupinder Singh is investigating the case.Civil rights groups here have condemned the incident.Jail Superintendent Sanjay Yadav and Deputy Jailor Jagdish Sharma were removed from duty and asked to wait for their new posting orders, while head warden Baidyanath Sharma and warden Ramswaroop were placed under suspension. Rakesh Mohan Sharma has been posted as the new Jail Superintendent.A five-member board conducted the post-mortem under the supervision of a Judicial Magistrate on Thursday and the body of the deceased was kept in the mortuary of the Sawai Man Singh Government Hospital here.Civil rights groups here have condemned the incident, saying Shakir Ullah was murdered as the result of an “increasing hate environment”, the latest trigger being the Pulwama terror attack. The People’s Union for Civil Liberties demanded security for all prisoners, particularly the “vulnerable ones” like the Pakistani and Kashmiri inmates who could become victims of aggression.Security has been stepped up in all the jails in the State where Pakistani nationals are lodged. At present, 18 Pakistani prisoners are lodged in the State’s jails and seven of them are in Jaipur.last_img read more

Bid to disrupt NRC update, says Sonowal

first_imgAssam Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal on Tuesday claimed that “negative elements” were trying to disrupt the ongoing process to update the National Register of Citizens (NRC) and his government was determined to thwart any such attempts. Mr. Sonowal also asked “genuine” Indian citizens not to panic as their concerns would be adequately addressed in the mega exercise aimed at identifying those illegal immigrants who had entered the State after 1971. “There are some negative elements. These negative elements are trying to disrupt the smooth proceedings of the NRC update. The State government is alive to the situation,” he said.“There are some groups which are trying to create unrest in Assam in the name of NRC. Our government is determined to thwart any such attempts,” the Chief Minister said.Mr. Sonowal is in the national capital and he held a meeting with Home Minister Rajnath Singh and top officials of the Union Home Ministry to review the present security scenario in the State and preparation to deal with any possible law and order situation which may arise after the publication of the final NRC. ‘Adequate steps’“Both the State and the central government will take adequate steps for peaceful publication of the NRC. I appeal to the people to extend cooperation, the way they did during the publication of the draft last year,” he said. Mr. Sonowal said grievances of all bonafide Indian citizens will be adequately addressed in the update process of the NRC.last_img read more

House Panel Subpoenas EPA for Air Pollution Data

first_imgIn a rare step, the science committee of the U.S. House of Representatives voted yesterday to subpoena the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for data from key studies used to justify air pollution regulations.Following a heated exchange of letters between Committee Chair Lamar Smith (R-TX) and ranking member Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX), the committee approved its first subpoena in 21 years. The vote was strictly along party lines, with Democrats opposing the measure.The information in question includes the underlying data in a 1993 paper considered to be groundbreaking work on the impact of air pollution. In the so-called Six Cities Study, Harvard researchers followed more than 8000 participants for 14 to 16 years and found an association between death rates and particulate matter, or soot, in the air. The study informed EPA’s 1997 decision to tighten its air quality standards and continues to underpin Clean Air Act regulations. Smith has repeatedly requested that EPA hand over raw data from the Six Cities Study and from a related (and much larger) American Cancer Society study known as “Cancer Prevention Study II,” plus all subsequent reanalysis of the studies. He accused the agency of using “secret science” to justify environmental regulations.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Smith gave EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy an ultimatum in a 22 July letter, threatening a subpoena if the information—which would include personal health information from study participants promised confidentiality—wasn’t turned over by the end of the month. On Tuesday, Johnson responded to Smith’s subpoena threat with outrage. In her letter, she claimed that his evidence for questioning the validity of the studies was shoddy and that a subpoena would violate the trust of hundreds of thousands of Americans who had participated in the Six Cities Study and other research included in the subpoena. She demanded that Smith clarify who would receive the data and for what purpose.In his response, the chairman acknowledged that the data would need to be “de-identified” to protect the privacy and health information of the participants.Economist C. Arden Pope of Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, one of the authors on the Six Cities Study, says that turning over what Smith requests would undoubtedly violate the confidentiality agreement made with participants. “It’s extremely hard to give a data set that will allow you to replicate the results in these studies that doesn’t include information that then allows you—with an Internet search of obituaries—to quickly figure out who the people were,” he says.Smith also explained in his letter that he intended to share the data with “independent scientists for review.” But Johnson, in yesterday’s opening statement, accused Smith of intending to pass the data to “industry hacks” who would try to discredit the research for financial gain. According to the subpoena that Smith signed following the vote, EPA now has until 19 August to turn over all relevant data. The agency has previously said it has provided Smith with all the relevant material that it has.last_img read more

ScienceShot: Birds Pay Attention to Speed Limits

first_imgHumans may not be the only ones heeding posted speed limits. Birds apparently take this information into account to avoid being hit by oncoming traffic as they forage near roads. On a drive home from the laboratory, researchers in Canada conducted a straightforward experiment: They traveled stretches of road with various speed limits (20, 50, 90, and 110 kilometers per hour) and tested how close a bird on or beside the road (like the magpie above) would allow the advancing car to come before fleeing its dangerous position—a measure called flight initiation distance. As soon as the scientists saw a bird ahead of them fly away, they started a timer and recorded how long it took them to reach the spot where the bird had been. They ran the experiment at different speeds—at, above, and below the legal limits. When they calculated the distance at which birds bailed for safer ground, they found that this distance was greater on roads with higher speed limits. However, the speed of the car itself had no effect on flight initiation distance. It seems that the birds didn’t judge the speed of a specific oncoming vehicle, but instead associated each stretch of road with a degree of risk based on the speed limit and took extra precautions on faster roads, the researchers report online today in Biology Letters. They suggest this measurement might improve future conservation efforts by showing how birds adapt to increasingly human-dominated environments.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Top Stories: Reprogramming Mouse Cells, Stressed-Out Birds, and Speedy Evolution

first_imgCells Reprogrammed in Living MiceStem cells are usually made in a petri dish. Now, scientists have figured out how to reprogram the cells of living mice, transforming them into an embryolike state able to become any of the body’s cell types—even placenta. In the experiment, that conversion wasn’t tightly controlled; somewhat creepily, the mice developed tumors that resembled embryos. Nevertheless, the finding could conceivably help scientists repair tissue with living patients someday.A Flat-Out Major Advance for an Emerging Solar Cell TechnologySign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Researchers have figured out that a promising solar cell material called perovskite can be manufactured using standard techniques for handling common silicon without sacrificing efficiency in converting sunlight to energy. The advance boosts the chance that this material, which is a lot cheaper than its silicon counterparts, will hit the mainstream market.No Point in Testing Controversial Stem Cell Treatment, Italian Panel SaysAn expert panel that the Italian government asked to come up with a trial design for a controversial Italian stem cell therapy has thrown in the towel. The group, made up of top Italian scientists, has concluded that the treatment—designed by the Stamina Foundation and the focus of an intense public debate in Italy—has no scientific foundation and that there is no point in doing the study, for which the Italian government has allocated €3 million.Big-Brained Birds Keep Their CoolWhen it comes to avoiding stress, big brains are better than little ones. A study shows that birds with big brains have lower levels of a key stress hormone. Researchers think brainy birds keep their cool by anticipating or learning to avoid problems more effectively than their smaller-brained counterparts.U.S. Science Laureate Bill Hits RoadblockClimate science skeptics have derailed a congressional proposal to create the honorary position of U.S. science laureate. But proponents haven’t abandoned the idea of giving someone a national platform to foster public understanding of science and serve as a role model.Evolution’s Clock Ticked Faster at the Dawn of Modern AnimalsFive hundred thirty million years ago, the number and diversity of life forms on Earth mushroomed. This so-called Cambrian explosion kept Charles Darwin, the father of evolution, awake at night, as he worried that his theory of natural selection couldn’t explain the sudden proliferation of species. Now, researchers have combined evidence from the fossil record with clues in the genes of living species to estimate the speed of that evolutionary explosion. Their finding—that the rate of change was high, but still plausible—may put Darwin’s fears to rest.last_img read more

NSF Advises Political Science Applicants to Pay Heed to Senator’s Amendment

first_imgPolitical scientists trying to win a grant from the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) should explain how their research will contribute to the nation’s economic development or security.That advice, offered publicly last Friday by NSF, is a change from present practices. It reflects the language in a controversial amendment by Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) to a government-wide spending bill that Congress approved this past March. He believes that NSF’s two existing criteria for reviewing proposals, their scientific merit and the “broader impacts” of the research, don’t ensure that the agency’s $10 million political science program will be spent wisely. In effect, Coburn’s amendment adds a third criterion, namely, that the research contribute either to economic development or national security. The research community has roundly attacked the new language.A 1 November letter posted on the agency’s website tells applicants to “keep in mind” the Coburn language when preparing submissions for the next grant deadline, 15 January. Joanne Tornow, NSF’s acting head of the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Directorate that includes political science, writes that “[t]he relationship of the proposed research to these goals should be addressed both in the broader impacts section of the project summary and within the project description.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)That new approach troubles some political scientists. “Incorporating the Coburn language will change the game for PIs, for reviewers, and for program officers,” predicts Jim Granato, head of the Hobby Center for Public Policy at the University of Houston in Texas and a former NSF program officer. “You may scare off some people,” he adds, speculating that some researchers may seek funding from other NSF program areas, such as law or sociology, to avoid being affected by the Coburn language, which applies only to the political science program.NSF acting Director Cora Marrett, however, is playing down the impact of the congressional language on the community and on the quality of NSF’s portfolio. “The letter to the community says the present law is in effect,” she said yesterday at the annual Washington meeting of the Consortium of Social Science Associations (COSSA). “But does that mean we expect every proposal submitted to be about national security and economic development? Not at all. We know the community. And if the approach is broad enough, it should not be a problem to support the first-rate projects coming in. So I’m not worried about the consequences to the program.”At the COSSA meeting, Marrett and other senior agency officials described how the agency has struggled to integrate the Coburn amendment into its merit review system. In particular, the challenge was to apply the third criterion to proposals that had been written before it was adopted.NSF officials didn’t want “to change the rules in midstream,” Tornow explains. So last spring, the agency decided to review those proposals already in hand using the two traditional criteria. Then, several weeks later, NSF convened a second panel that applied the Coburn language “to those proposals deemed most meritorious.” Program managers then weighed both sets of comments before making their funding recommendations to higher-ups. Tornow said NSF will be notifying scientists later this month about the fate of their proposals.In contrast, the panel reviews of the January 2014 submissions will take place in one step rather than two. In addition to applying NSF’s regular criteria, Tornow writes, reviewers “will be asked to provide input on the degree to which the proposed research projects promote national security or the economic interests of the United States.” Programs officers will take those views into consideration when making funding recommendations, Tornow explains.Tornow told the COSSA audience that the new process “is in line with what we always do at NSF.” That may be true, technically, but it will still require political scientists to play by new rules.last_img read more

ScienceShot: How Some Goldfish Got Two Tails

first_imgThe twin tails of some prized goldfish varieties didn’t arise naturally: Ancient Chinese fish aficionados deliberately bred for this trait. Chinese started keeping goldfish for their ornamental value around the year 1000, during the Song Dynasty. About 600 years later, during the Ming Dynasty, domesticated goldfish with one right tail and another on the left appear in historical records. Such fish are rarely seen in nature. Researchers have now traced this distinctive feature to a genetic mutation in a gene that controls development of the back end of the spine. In normal goldfish, there is a single set of bones in the tail. In goldfish with the mutation, the tail skeleton splits into mirror image left and right sides. The genetic mutation arose naturally, but then twin-tail goldfish varieties were “established and maintained by breeders in Song to Ming dynasty China,” the researchers report online today in Nature Communications.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Indian research scholars welcome big bonanza in stipends

first_imgNEW DELHI—An announcement yesterday from the Indian government that young scientists will receive a roughly 60% increase in their stipends drew a mixed reaction from the scientific community. Although the graduate students and postdocs are certainly grateful for the economic boost, they resent the government’s description of it as a “special gift.” And they are disappointed that it apparently took prolonged protests to force the government’s hand.“No doubt this is a long-overdue, much-needed relief to research scholars,” Raghavendra Gadagkar, an evolutionary biologist and president of the Indian National Science Academy here, told ScienceInsider. “But what is really required is a policy by which there are periodic and predictable revisions in scholarships roughly along the lines of [what] is paid to salaried employees. In the present system, every scholarship hike is preceded by agitation, disrupting normal work, and creating a bitter environment. More importantly, the present system conveys the impression that one can get anything through agitation but nothing without agitation.”The larger stipends come after months of protests, including a gathering of 800 scholars outside the gates of the science ministry here. India’s science minister, Jitendra Singh, said “the demand was legitimate and the science ministry worked doubly hard to get this pay hike implemented quickly even in these times of economic hardship.” Without the increase, he said, “many would have left their research jobs for other lucrative avenues.” Singh called the boost a “special gift” from the government on the eve of Diwali, the festival of lights where Hindus pray to the goddess of wealth.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The raises are “a welcome step,” says Pankaj Jain, a Ph.D. student in molecular biophysics at the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore and a leader of the institute’s Students’ Council that led the fight for a pay boost. But Jain feels more reforms are needed to attract students into science, including a regular pay ladder.The increases, which went into effect on 1 October, apply to some 71,000 young scientists receiving support from the federal government. A graduate student in a Ph.D. program will receive Rs 25,000 per month ($410), up from Rs 16,000, and a research associate (equivalent to a postdoc) will get a hike from Rs 24,000 to Rs 40,000 per month. In addition, the trainees receive a housing allowance and medical benefits, which vary according to location and institution. The increases will boost overall government spending on fellowships by 45%, to Rs 24,130 million ($400 million).last_img read more