BLOG: Governor Wolf Signs DUI Ignition Interlock Bill into Law (Round-up)

first_imgBLOG: Governor Wolf Signs DUI Ignition Interlock Bill into Law (Round-up) May 27, 2016 Round-Up,  The Blog Wednesday, Governor Wolf signed Senate Bill 290 into law, which makes the ignition interlock program mandatory for first-time DUI offenders with high blood alcohol levels.“Drunk driving is a deadly crime that puts Pennsylvania families at risk and this legislation will help prevent people from driving drunk and endangering themselves and putting other lives at risk,” Governor Wolf said. “We owe it to both motorists and pedestrians to keep them safe and hold people who break DUI laws accountable.”Take a look at the additional coverage below: Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf By: Eryn Spangler, Press Assistant Philly.com: Wolf signs DUI ignition interlock billThe new law requires drunk drivers with a first-time conviction and a blood-alcohol concentration of 0.10 percent or greater to use ignition interlocks for at least one year. Supporters of requiring ignition interlocks say they protect people on the roads while also allowing offenders to keep a job and meet other responsibilities. Until now, Pennsylvania has required ignition interlock only for repeat drunk drivers.York Dispatch: Gov. signs DUI bill into lawA new law will require all Pennsylvania residents, including first-time offenders, convicted of driving under the influence with a high blood-alcohol content to have an ignition interlock system installed in their vehicle. The device requires the driver to blow into a device, verifying their blood-alcohol level is below .08 before the vehicle will turn on. Governor Tom Wolf signed Senate Bill 290 into law Wednesday.PennLive: Wolf signs bill extending ignition interlock devices to first-time DUI offendersThe law takes effect in 15 months, according to staff for Sen. John Rafferty, R-Montgomery County, who sponsored the bill. Previously, the ignition interlock devices were only available to repeat DUI offenders. But supporters favored this measure as a way to strengthen public protections while giving offenders a chance to keep their post-arrest lives intact.ABC 27: Gov. Wolf signs bill to expand ignition-lock law to first offensesGov. Tom Wolf has signed a bill to expand the use of ignition locks for people caught driving under the influence. Senate Bill 290 makes the ignition interlock program mandatory for first-time DUI offenders with high blood-alcohol levels. The devices are installed on a steering column. Drivers are required to blow into them, and if alcohol is detected, the vehicle will not start.CBS Philly: Governor Wolf Signs Ignition Interlocks BillIn a statement announcing that he has signed the interlocks bill, Governor Wolf characterizes it as a safety issue, saying it will prevent people from driving while intoxicated and hold people accountable when they break DUI laws. Supporters of the legislation believe it will also allow more people to remain employed and remain productive members of society.FOX 29: Governor Wolf signs ignition Interlock law for first-time drunk driversAccording to a press release, SB 290 was authored by Senator John Rafferty. Representative Keith Greiner authored similar legislation in the House, and joined Senator Rafferty and Senator Lloyd Smucker in championing this life-saving legislation. “The bill signed today by Governor Wolf is a great step in MADD meeting the mission to end drunk driving. Between October 1, 2003 and December 1, 2015, ignition interlocks prevented more than 78,000 instances of drunken driving here in Pennsylvania,” said MADD Pennsylvania Program Manager Malcolm Friend. “Through this new law, imagine how many more lives will be saved, how many injuries will be prevented here in Pennsylvania moving forward.” SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Update on the latest sports

first_imgHis wife, Nancy, says Millsaps died Friday night at his home after a period of declining health.,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6 Gundy said Saturday it was never his intention to offend anyone, adding that his first priority is and will always be the student-athletes and doing what is best for the program and the university.VIRUS OUTBREAK-SPORTSWTA’s Rogers Cup scrubbed from scheduleUNDATED (AP) — The Rogers Cup women’s tennis tournament will not be played this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.Tennis Canada announced Saturday that the event, scheduled for Aug. 7-16 in Montreal, is off the schedule. It says the tournament will return to Montreal in August 2021. Associated Press FIFA INVESTIGATION-BLATTERSwiss prosecutors intend to drop 1 FIFA case against BlatterGENEVA (AP) — Former FIFA (FEE’-fuh) president Sepp Blatter has won a legal victory in his nearly five-year fight against Swiss allegations of criminal mismanagement.The Swiss attorney general’s office has confirmed reports they intend to close an investigation into how Blatter and soccer governing body FIFA awarded World Cup broadcast rights in the Caribbean in 2005.The decision is the latest example in recent weeks of the Swiss FIFA cases stalling. However, the separate and cooperating American investigation sparked back into life with new indictments and fresh allegations of World Cup bid bribery. Perunovich claims Hobey Baker AwardUNDATED (AP) — Minnesota Duluth defenseman Scott Perunovich has won the Hobey Baker Memorial Award as college hockey’s top player, edging North Dakota forward Jordan Kawaguchi and Maine goalie Jeremy Swayman.The junior from Hibbing, Minnesota, became the first defenseman to lead the National Collegiate Hockey Association in scoring, finishing with 40 points on six goals and 34 assists in 34 games.Perunovich recently signed with the St. Louis Blues, who selected him in the second round of the 2018 NHL draft.INDYCAR-VIRTUAL RACING The women’s and men’s Rogers Cup traditionally rotate between Toronto and Montreal. As of Saturday, the men’s event in Toronto in August was still on the schedule.In other news related to the coronavirus pandemic:— The Arizona Coyotes will furlough half of the organization’s employees with the NHL season on hold due to the coronavirus outbreak. The furloughs began Friday and will last through June 30. The Coyotes say all furloughed employees will continue to receive 100% of health benefits.— The Orlando Magic’s home arena will become a distribution center for medical equipment and supplies as part of the ongoing response to the coronavirus pandemic. The Amway Center will be a hub for equipment and supplies that will go to 50 hospitals in Central Florida as well as facilities in seven other states.— The American Hockey League’s Syracuse Crunch has loaned two sanitation machines to a local hospital to see if they could help clean personal protective equipment worn by hospital staff. The Crunch uses one of the machines in its locker room and the other to clean equipment but doesn’t need them right now with sports on hold because of the coronavirus pandemic. Turns out they’re a good fit at Upstate University Hospital. April 11, 2020 Woods joining Sun DevilsTEMPE, Ariz. (AP) — Portland State basketball transfer Holland “Boo Boo” Woods is headed home, announcing on Twitter that he’s going to play for Arizona State.The 6-foot-1 guard averaged 17.7 points 5.2 assists and 2.5 as a junior last season. He earned first-team all-Big Sky honors and finished second in the conference in assists.Woods played at Glendale Apollo High School before spending the past three seasons at Portland State.He will have to sit out a season under NCAA transfer rules unless he is granted a waiver. Cave was placed in a medically induced coma Tuesday at a Toronto hospital, where he was taken after being admitted to a medical facility in Barrie, Ontario, the previous day. Cave underwent emergency surgery Tuesday to remove a colloid cyst that was causing pressure on his brain.The NHL club confirmed Cave’s death with a statement from his family.Cave was acquired by the Oilers from the Bruins in January 2019. He played 44 games for Edmonton and scored once in 11 contests for the Oilers this season, spending most of his time with the team’s AHL affiliate at Bakersfield.NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman said of Cave: “Undrafted but undaunted, Colby was relentless in the pursuit of his hockey dream.”COLLEGE HOCKEY-HOBEY BAKER AWARD COLLEGE FOOTBALL-OKLAHOMA STATE-GUNDYGundy apologizes for COVID-19 commentsSTILLWATER, Okla. (AP) — Oklahoma State football coach Mike Gundy has apologized for his comments this week about the COVID-19 pandemic.Gundy said during a teleconference call Tuesday that he hoped to have the team return to its facilities May 1. His proposed timetable would have defied federal social-distancing guidelines and was quickly disputed by the university.Athletic director Mike Holder also declined to back Gundy’s timeline, saying in a statement: “May 1 seems a little ambitious.” WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL-MISSISSIPPI STATE-MCCRAY-PENSONMississippi State hires Nikki McCray-Penson as women’s coachSTARKVILLE, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi State has hired Women’s Basketball Hall of Famer Nikki McCray-Penson to replace Vic Schafer as the Bulldogs’ head coach.McCray-Penson was 53-40 the past three years at Old Dominion. The Lady Monarchs posted consecutive 20-win campaigns under McCray, including a 24-6 mark this season. She was named the Conference USA coach of the year this year after going 14-4 versus league opponents.Schaefer left MSU for Texas after going 221-62. The ninth-ranked Bulldogs finished 27-6 this past season, which ended abruptly because of the coronavirus pandemic. Update on the latest sports Simon Pagenaud wins IndyCar’s 1st virtual race on an ovalUNDATED (AP) — Simon Pagenaud (PA’-zheh-noh) has won IndyCar’s first virtual race on an oval, conquering a simulated Michigan International Speedway.Sage Karam dominated the race, but a spectacular crash at the start jumbled strategies and Karam pitted from the lead with 14 laps remaining. It allowed Pagenaud and Team Penske teammate Scott McLaughlin to cycle into a 1-2 finish.Dale Earnhardt Jr. was third in his IndyCar iRacing debut. He said he’d race again the next time IndyCar goes to a virtual oval. COLLEGE BASKETBALL-WOODS-ARIZONA STATE The criminal proceeding against Blatter was opened 4 ½ years ago and helped remove him from the presidential office he held for more than 17 years.OBIT-WILLIAM MILLSAPSAward-winning sportswriter William Millsaps dies at age 77RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Award-winning sportswriter William H. “Bill” Millsaps Jr. has died at 77.Millsaps played basketball at the University of Tennessee and started his journalism career as a copy boy at the Chattanooga Times before joining the Richmond Times-Dispatch as a sportswriter in 1966. He spent nearly 40 years with the Times-Dispatch, becoming managing editor in 1992 and being elevated to vice president and executive editor two years later. He retired as a full-time writer in 2005 and was the 2011 recipient of the Red Smith Award, presented by The Associated Press Sports Editors for contributions to sports journalism. Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditNHL-OILERS-CAVE DIESOilers’ Colby Cave dies at 25TORONTO (AP) — Edmonton Oilers forward Colby Cave has died less than a week after being diagnosed with a brain bleed. He was 25.last_img read more

Top Stories: Reprogramming Mouse Cells, Stressed-Out Birds, and Speedy Evolution

first_imgCells Reprogrammed in Living MiceStem cells are usually made in a petri dish. Now, scientists have figured out how to reprogram the cells of living mice, transforming them into an embryolike state able to become any of the body’s cell types—even placenta. In the experiment, that conversion wasn’t tightly controlled; somewhat creepily, the mice developed tumors that resembled embryos. Nevertheless, the finding could conceivably help scientists repair tissue with living patients someday.A Flat-Out Major Advance for an Emerging Solar Cell TechnologySign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Researchers have figured out that a promising solar cell material called perovskite can be manufactured using standard techniques for handling common silicon without sacrificing efficiency in converting sunlight to energy. The advance boosts the chance that this material, which is a lot cheaper than its silicon counterparts, will hit the mainstream market.No Point in Testing Controversial Stem Cell Treatment, Italian Panel SaysAn expert panel that the Italian government asked to come up with a trial design for a controversial Italian stem cell therapy has thrown in the towel. The group, made up of top Italian scientists, has concluded that the treatment—designed by the Stamina Foundation and the focus of an intense public debate in Italy—has no scientific foundation and that there is no point in doing the study, for which the Italian government has allocated €3 million.Big-Brained Birds Keep Their CoolWhen it comes to avoiding stress, big brains are better than little ones. A study shows that birds with big brains have lower levels of a key stress hormone. Researchers think brainy birds keep their cool by anticipating or learning to avoid problems more effectively than their smaller-brained counterparts.U.S. Science Laureate Bill Hits RoadblockClimate science skeptics have derailed a congressional proposal to create the honorary position of U.S. science laureate. But proponents haven’t abandoned the idea of giving someone a national platform to foster public understanding of science and serve as a role model.Evolution’s Clock Ticked Faster at the Dawn of Modern AnimalsFive hundred thirty million years ago, the number and diversity of life forms on Earth mushroomed. This so-called Cambrian explosion kept Charles Darwin, the father of evolution, awake at night, as he worried that his theory of natural selection couldn’t explain the sudden proliferation of species. Now, researchers have combined evidence from the fossil record with clues in the genes of living species to estimate the speed of that evolutionary explosion. Their finding—that the rate of change was high, but still plausible—may put Darwin’s fears to rest.last_img read more