Governor Wolf: Approval of New Overtime Rules a Victory for Hardworking Pennsylvanians

first_imgGovernor Wolf: Approval of New Overtime Rules a Victory for Hardworking Pennsylvanians January 31, 2020 Jobs That Pay,  Press Release Building on his commitment to workers, Governor Tom Wolf announced the state’s Independent Regulatory Review Commission (IRRC) voted today to approve the Department of Labor & Industry’s final regulation that will extend overtime pay eligibility to 82,000 more workers.“This is an important victory for thousands of workers,” said Governor Wolf. “People who work overtime should be paid for it. This is absolutely the right thing to do.“Today’s approval of my plan will modernize our outdated overtime rules so more people are eligible for time-and-a-half pay. This will put more money in the pockets of workers and strengthen the middle class.”The new regulations require overtime pay to most full-time salaried workers in executive, administrative, and professional jobs if they make less than $45,500 by 2022.This increase will be phased in over three steps:$684 per week, $35,568 annually (federal rule that went into effect January 1, 2020);$780 per week, $40,560 annually in 2021; and$875 per week, $45,500 annually in 2022.Starting in 2023, the salary threshold will adjust automatically every three years.The Attorney General must approve the final regulation before it can be published in the Pennsylvania Bulletin and go into effect later this year.In addition to the 82,000 workers who will benefit from Pennsylvania’s new overtime regulations, the federal government raised the salary threshold to $35,568 on January 1, 2020, which made 61,000 Pennsylvanians newly eligible for overtime. With the combined rule changes, an estimated 143,000 more workers will be eligible for time-and-a-half pay by 2023.Earlier this week, Governor Wolf reinforced his commitment to helping hardworking Pennsylvanians by reintroducing his proposal to increase Pennsylvania’s minimum wage to $12 an hour with a pathway to $15.“Despite widespread support from the public, it’s been more than a decade since the General Assembly passed a minimum wage increase,” added Governor Wolf. “There are far too many Pennsylvanians working full-time and multiple jobs who are still unable to support themselves and their families.”The governor’s proposal would give a direct wage increase to 1 million workers, provide better financial stability for women, rural and tipped workers, enable thousands of people to work their way off public assistance, and grow the economy for everyone.Pennsylvania’s minimum wage has been stuck at $7.25 an hour since 2009, the minimum wage allowed by federal law. A full-time, year-round minimum wage worker earns only $15,080 annually, less than the federal poverty threshold for a family of two. Twenty-nine states have a higher minimum wage and 21 states are increasing the wage floor this year.The governor’s proposal raises the minimum wage to $12 an hour on July 1, 2020 with annual 50 cent increases until reaching $15 an hour in 2026. When workers are paid fairly, fewer people will need public assistance. At $15 an hour, nearly 93,000 adults will leave Medicaid and the workers will generate more than $300 million in state tax revenue in 2026.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Man Utd-Liverpool still the biggest Premier League draw

first_imgFor all the rancour between fans of the country’s two most successful clubs, located just 30 miles (48 kilometres) apart, they share much in common — a history of enviable success but also of deep tragedy.Last month United marked the 60th anniversary of the Munich air crash that killed 23 people, including eight players, on their way home from a European Cup quarter-final in Belgrade.In 1989, 96 Liverpool fans were killed in a crush at Sheffield Wednesday’s Hillsborough ground as they attended an FA Cup semi-final.Manchester United manager Jose Mourinho (left) is preparing to go head-to-head with Liverpool boss Jurgen Klopp © AFP/File / Oli SCARFF, Ben STANSALL“They have a global profile cities of a similar size don’t have and United and Liverpool have given them that profile,” Andy Mitten, editor of the United We Stand fanzine, and Manchester native, told AFP.“These are two huge clubs with similar histories of triumph and tragedy that hail from cities that punch well above their weight demographically.”The two sides first met as far back as 1894 — in the same year as the opening of the Manchester Ship Canal, which sparked tension between the rival cities by undermining Liverpool’s position as a commercial port.However, most of their success has been condensed into two prolonged spells of domination. Rarely have both clubs been on an upward curve at the same time.Liverpool left their rivals in the shade during a prolonged period of dominance from 1973 until 1990, winning 11 league titles and four European Cups.Alex Ferguson, who arrived at Old Trafford in 1986, famously described “knocking Liverpool off their perch” as his biggest challenge as United manager and he duly delivered, ending the Red Devils’ 25-year wait to win the league, scooping up 13 titles and two Champions League crowns.– City still trailing –Neither side have won the Premier League since Ferguson retired in 2013, though, and when they meet on Saturday it will be second place rather than the title on the line, with runaway leaders Manchester City the new top dogs in the northwest.Jose Mourinho’s United are on 62 points, just two ahead of Jurgen Klopp’s Liverpool. City are over the horizon with 78.Alex Ferguson won 13 Premier League titles at Manchester United © AFP/File / PAUL ELLISYet that has not diluted the feeling on both sides of the divide that a clash between United and Liverpool remains the highlight on the English football calendar.“Over the history of English football it is certainly the biggest,” former Liverpool winger Steve McManaman told AFP.The year after Ferguson’s departure, United fans had an uncomfortable choice to make as City pipped Liverpool to the title, extending the Anfield club’s now 28-year drought without winning the league.“It was interesting in 2014 when both were going for the title how many United fans didn’t want Liverpool to win it because they haven’t won it for 28 years and they had 18 titles to City’s three,” said Mitten.“City are a better team than Liverpool but they’ve just overtaken Huddersfield Town with four titles.”However, the price of success has been a gradual chipping away at their local identity.Both clubs are now American-owned, coached by a German and a Portuguese, while their top scorers, Mohamed Salah for Liverpool and Romelu Lukaku for Manchester United, hail from Egypt and Belgium.When the sides line up on Saturday, it is possible not a single Mancunian or Scouser will feature among the 22 players that start.“Local players add something intangible, a sort of mentality that is hard to find or instil in players that hail from elsewhere,” said Zarif Rasul, author of “Liverpool FC: The Greatest Goals”.“It has felt as though the team have lacked something since Steven Gerrard and Jamie Carragher hung up their boots.”But that loss of identity does not dim the delight in getting one over on your biggest rivals.“Irrespective of the teams’ positions in the table, everything is always better after beating United,” added Rasul.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Liverpool and Manchester United have won a combined 38 English league titles © AFP/File / Paul ELLISMANCHESTER, United Kingdom, Mar 9 – The bitter rivalry between Manchester United and Liverpool is now played out on a global stage but the origins of the divide are deeply rooted in the battle for supremacy in England’s northwest.United and Liverpool, who both play in red, have a combined tally of 38 English league titles and eight European Cups and both enjoy a vast following throughout Britain and around the world.last_img read more