Tom Arscott – Worcester and Bristol

first_imgTAGS: Worcester Warriors TA: To fly or be invisible. If I was invisible I’d probably just go around listening to conversations I wasn’t supposed to.RW: Would you care to share your most embarrassing moment?TA: Ever or in rugby? I think I’ve probably suppressed them all because I can’t think of any right now, even from rugby.RW: Do you have any phobias?TA: I’m not a big fan of spiders. I wouldn’t say that it was a phobia, but I don’t really like them.RW: How about bugbears?TA: Not really. I’m generally quite laid-back, although if I’m tired my temper does shorten quite a bit.RW: Who would you like to be trapped in a lift with?TA: Jeremy Clarkson or Simon Cowell – the banter would be good.RW: If a film was made of your life, who would you want to play you?TA: Luke says Owen Wilson, but no, not him. Either Jude Law or the guy out of Cruel Intentions, Ryan Phillippe.RW: Who’s your ideal woman?TA: Rachel Bilson.Check out his tries against Wasps…Learn more about Tom’s teammates at Worcester… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Tom Arscott seals the dealWhile Tom was still at Bristol, we caught up with him to talk about sibling rivalry [his brother Luke plays for Exeter], try-scoring celebrations, and stupid purchases. RUGBY WORLD: So, who are the jokers at Bristol?TOM ARSCOTT: There are a few really – Shaun Perry, Mark Regan and Luke, my brother. There’s always lots of banter flying around. Jason Hobson and Darren Crompton, the front-row boys, are another couple who get involved. There are a fair few boys who are jokers.RW: Do you get picked on by the guys for anything in particular?TA: No, not really, just for having crazy hair. There’s nothing apart from that.RW: You scored nine tries for Bristol last season. Are you going to work on your try celebrations like a footballer?TA: I just try to keep it simple. I get too excited and I couldn’t think about having a real planned celebration. I just do whatever comes to my mind at the time because I’m too excited, too pleased to have scored a try.RW: Is it strange playing with your brother, Luke, or do you like it?TA: I really enjoy playing with him. We’d played apart for a couple of seasons [Tom was at Plymouth Albion and Luke at Bristol before last season], so it’s now nice to have a bit of understanding with each other, more than you might have with another team-mate.RW: And you live together, too. Do you share all the household chores?TA: I’d say yes but I think Luke would say no! To be fair, he does do a lot of it, he looks after me. We get on pretty well; we just have little arguments as any siblings would. He’s just bought another place, though, so he’ll be moving out soon. Then I’ll have to sort myself out.Superpowers, Remote controlled aeroplanes and his Ideal Woman…RW: If your house was on fire, what three things would you save?TA: My dog and my golf clubs. What else would I save? My mobile.RW: If you were stranded on a desert island, what three things would you want with you?TA: My phone again – providing it would work. Something to go hunting with and a house, or is that too big?RW: What’s the most stupid thing you’ve ever purchased?TA: There’s probably a lot of things I shouldn’t have bought that I have, but nothing that comes straight to mind. [He then has a quick chat with his brother!] I didn’t buy this, but I asked for a remote control aeroplane for my 11th birthday. You built it yourself and then took it out to fly. I turned 21 this summer and it’s still not been built! I got halfway through, but then gave up and it’s still in the box.RW: If you could have one superpower, what would it be? Pat Sanderson Nolli Watermanlast_img read more

The Championship Blog – Week 4 round-up

first_img Winning ways: Dean Richards’ table-topping Newcastle side only dropped a point in this weekend’s roundHERE’S a bit of statistical analysis to kick-off this week’s Championship blog, writes Richard Grainger.In the Championship — which doesn’t have a sponsor — 355 points were scored in round four. That’s an average of 59 points over six games. Compare that to the Premiership — which is sponsored by Aviva, where a mere 272 points were scored, at an average of only 45 points per game last weekend.If points mean entertainment, then surely this is an attractive investment for a sponsor, even in difficult times?An example of the entertainment the Championship has to offer was at Headingley on Sunday, were 81 of those points were scored. Bristol were demolished by the hosts and were out contention after a 27-0 first-half hiding.Both sides contributed five tries, but that was the only area of parity between the teams. Joe Ford was on target with all of the conversions, as he was with five penalties.Head coach Liam Middeton told the Bristol website: “We scored five tries but I can’t take any positives from that result. If you score five, you need to win the game… If you lose your focus, then you will take a beating. That happened today and I expect a big reaction on Friday.”Also on Sunday at the Mennaye Field, Newcastle dropped their first point through failing to score a fourth try against the Cornish Pirates. Rob Vickers, Taiasina Tu’ifua and Tom Catterick crossed for the visitors and Jimmy Gopperth added a penalty and two conversions.But the Falcons were made to work hard for their fourth consecutive win, in wet and windy Cornish conditions, with Catterick’s try coming late in the game.Head Coach Dean Richards said: “With the conditions the way that they were it was important that we took our time and picked our plays. They are of course a very good side and we gave them a lot of respect coming into this game as we knew they would be difficult opposition.”Bedford Blues remain tethered to the Falcons’ claws by virtue of a 27-25 win over Nottingham at Goldington Road on Saturday. They left it very late, and owed it to Ben Ransom’s try in the 12th minute of injury time added on by referee Mr Darren Gamage, to turn what looked like a losing bonus point into victory. Indeed, even a losing bonus point looked unlikely at the interval, as the Blues took a 3-22 deficit into the changing rooms.The Green and Whites were much the better side in the first period but poor discipline in the form of a yellow card for Michael Holford, and a penalty try after Nottingham repeatedly infringed on their own try line brought the hosts back into the game.Jersey continued to show that can score tries and crossed four times against the Titans at Clifton Road on Saturday, all of which were converted by Mike Le Bourgeois, who also added a penalty.However, Rotherham scored six through Eamonn Sheridan, Carl Kirwan, Pale Nonu, Alex Rieder, Mike Doneghan and Garry Law, who also added 24 points with the boot, to finish 54-31 ahead.At the Athletic Ground in Richmond, London Scottish bounced back from a 0-14 deficit, to score three tries and turn round  22-14 to the good.The Exiles’ scrum again proved itself to be one of the most proficient units in the division, and were rewarded for their efforts with a penalty try to secure the bonus point. However, Doncaster were always in the game and it wasn’t until lock Paul Spivey scored the Exiles’ fifth try that Scottish were assured of the win. The final score was 37-26.Finally, in another tight game at Billesley Common, Plymouth Albion made it three out of four, recording their first away win of the campaign. Paul Roberts was on song with the boot, and Sam Hocking scored two tries to make it five for the season, to register a 22-24 win. Pick of this weekend’s matches, all of which with the exception of Jersey V Bedford will be played on Friday evening, should be Leeds Carnegie’s trip to Newcastle to take on the promotion hopefuls.This week’s action leaves things looking like this… BRISTOL, ENGLAND – SEPTEMBER 02: Newcastle Falcons director of Rugby Dean Richards looks on before the RFU Championship game between Bristol and Newcastle Falcons at Memorial Stadium on September 2, 2012 in Bristol, England. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Residency rules, okay?

first_imgBy Alex LoweWHEN ENGLAND walk out to play South Africa at Twickenham on November 24, each player will be accompanied by a mascot from his formative club.It is a thoughful touch, the latest idea from Stuart Lancaster to remind his squad who they represent each time they pull on an England jersey. It is part of a noble and effective plan to reconnect the national team with their public.Unfortunately, my first question to the Rugby Football Union was: “So, are you paying for Thomas Waldrom to fly a kid over from Lower Hutt, New Zealand?”Maybe I am just too cynical but the idea simply highlighted to me the number of players who had to nominate a junior English club because they do not have one.Waldrom, Mouritz Botha, Brad Barritt and David Paice are clear-cut examples of players who played their formative rugby abroad before qualifying for England…or discovering a grandmother.None of this is black and white. Dylan Hartley, Manu Tuilagi, Alex Corbisiero and Mako Vunipola were all born overseas but all have played junior rugby in England. This is the modern rugby world.England are selecting players who are available to them under the regulations. In fact they always have done: from the Russian Prince Obolensky to the dual international Jamie Salmon; from the Tongan volcano Lesley Vainikolo to the Afrikaner Hendre Fourie.What really concerns me are the countries who are actively exploiting the rules; the likes of Scotland who have an open policy to recruit “project signings” with the aim of qualifying them on residency grounds. Edinburgh’s South African prop WP Nel was the first.“For Scotland to compete in years to come, we have to do this,” said Edinburgh chairman Jim Calder.This is an unacceptable situation which damages the integrity of Test rugby but the International Rugby Board seemed to be entirely unconcerned about it when I asked them.No one will convince me it is good for Test rugby to see two South African cousins – Richardt and Adriaan Strauss – playing against each other in Ireland’s Test against the Springboks. MAASTRICHT, NETHERLANDS – SEPTEMBER 23: Bradley Wiggins of Great Britain lines up at the start of the Men’s Elite Road Race on day eight of the UCI Road World Championships on September 23, 2012 in Maastricht, Netherlands. (Photo by Bryn Lennon/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Very down to earth, Wiggo, and by the way, get well soon!Follow Alex Lowe on Twitter @AlexMLowecenter_img Granny gate: should Thomas Waldrom be allowed to wear the Red Rose? The England and Wales Cricket Board recently increased their residency qualification period to seven years. The IRB should follow suit with something similar.Unfortunately, they will not because it would require the support of those countries who are benefitting from the current situation. These unions should be focusing on developing the next generation, not hiring them as international mercenaries and opportunists.My proposal? A player is captured for one country when he or she has played at Under-20 level; residency qualification should be increased to at least five years, or maybe even seven; players should be able to qualify for a country through their parents only.****One of the boys: Bradley WigginsAnother of Stuart Lancaster’s motivational techniques has been to invite guest speakers to address the England squad with messages of inspiration and tales of their own heroic sporting deeds.During the Six Nations, it was Gary Neville and Kevin Sinfield. Before the autumn Internationals it was Bradley Wiggins, the Tour de France winner and Olympic road race champion.Wiggins connected immediately with the England squad. They liked the fact he enjoyed a few pints when he was not in training and hung on his every word.“He is a very inspiring individual,” said Tom Johnson. “I took away from it how dedicated he was and exactly what it will take for us to get to the next level. He is a very down to earth man.”But we all know how merciless a rugby crowd can be.“Unfortunately, the talk got cut short because he had a helicopter waiting,” Johnson revealed. “He was very embarrassed about that and the boys gave him a lot of gip!”last_img read more

RBS 6 Nations: England analysis

first_imgEngland scored just five tries in the whole championship, four of them against Scotland in the opening round when Owen Farrell and Billy Twelvetrees brought some fresh attacking ideas to the red-rose game.Brad Barritt is a totem in defence for England, one of Lancaster’s generals, but he offers nothing creative in attack and the experiment of using Alex Goode as a second playmaker is not working.New boy: is it time to start Billy Vunipola?The injury to Ben Morgan cost England a direct ball-carrier who could cross the gain-line and break things open.The back three, like the back row, is safe and secure but they have asked no attacking questions. England lack vision in midfield and strike runners.Against Wales, England’s scrum and breakdown failings meant that they had no foothold in the game from which to mount any sustained pressure.When they did get on the front doot, England lacked composure – as they did against Italy. Manu Tuilagi’s knock-on with a huge gap in front of him was poor, but too often England forced passes or lost the ball in contact.Action: The Billy boys. Twelvetrees should get extended game-time at 12 this summer and Vunipola at No 8. England also need to look towards the likes of Jonny May, Jonathan Joseph, Christian Wade and Kyle Eastmond.PERSPECTIVEDespite the embarrasment of the final scoreline in Cardiff and the paucity of their attacking game, there was much for England to be proud of during the Six Nations. The foundation stones of the team are in place. The character and defensive fortitude that carried them to victories over Ireland, France and Italy gives Lancaster the perfect platform from which to develop his team, add more attacking layers and come back stronger for the autumn Internationals next season.Action: Don’t panic.Alex Lowe’s England squad for the first Test v Argentina in Salta in June (taking likely Lions call-ups into account):M Brown (Harlequins); J May (Gloucester), J Joseph (London Irish), B Twelvetrees (Gloucester), B Foden (Northampton); F Burns (Gloucester), D Care (Harlequins); M Vunipola (Saracens), D Hartley (Northampton), H Thomas (Sale Sharks), G Kitchener (Leicester), C Lawes (Northampton), J Haskell (Wasps), M Kvesic (Worcester), B Vunipola (Wasps). Pulling together: England players huddle after their record 30-3 defeat by Wales at the Millennium StadiumBy Alex LoweIT WAS a Millennium mauling, a Cardiff crushing, a record red dragon rout. England’s Grand Slam ambitions were ravaged by a 30-3 defeat to Wales, who retained their RBS 6 Nations title in stunning fashion.All the England players could say afterwards was that they were well beaten and they must learn from it. The first comment was true, the second needs to be. But what are those lessons?EXPERIENCEExperience is a quality that cannot be taught. It has to be, er, experienced. Stuart Lancaster wants England to reach the 2015 World Cup having won a Grand Slam so they understand what it takes to win all-or-nothing games. That know-how is part of Wales’ DNA after they reached the World Cup semi-final in 2011, won the Grand Slam in 2012 and the title in 2013. Lancaster is astute enough to ensure England’s rookie team – for that is what they still are – will be better for Saturday’s painful experience.Action: Bottle the humiliation, come back stronger next year and complete the Grand Slam. Simple.Immense: England captain Chris RobshawBREAKDOWNPrivately, England were aggrieved at how referee Steve Walsh interpreted the breakdown. Time and again England ball-carriers would be turned over or penalised. In the end they stopped competing for the ball. That said, no excuses were made because England’s back row was outplayed.England captain Chris Robshaw was immense for England all tournament and Tom Wood tackled himself to a standstill, but they are operating in an imbalanced back-row unit. While capable of bettering other back rows that rely on size – Ireland and South Africa, for example – they were unable to compete with Wales’ two breakdown limpets Justin Tipuric and Sam Warburton.Action: Matt Kvesic of Worcester and Saracens’ Will Fraser are the best up-and-coming opensides and need a chance in Argentina this summer.TIGHT FIVEThis is the first real setback of Graham Rowntree’s stellar coaching career. The England scrum that creaked at times against Ireland, France and Italy finally crumbled at the Millennium Stadium. The Welsh were technically superior, but they also managed referee Walsh much better.England have sorely missed the injured Alex Corbisiero. Tom Youngs is still learning the role of hooker and there are concerns that Joe Launchbury and Geoff Parling do not offer enough power in the engine room, for all their other qualities.Action: Prop Henry Thomas should get his chance on the summer tour, as should lock Graham Kitchener.ATTACK Replacements: J Gray (Harlequins), D Wilson (Bath), J Marler (Harlequins), G Robson (Harlequins), W Fraser (Saracens), G Ford (Leicester), J Simpson (Wasps), C Wade (Wasps).Follow Alex Lowe on Twitter @AlexMLowe NOT FOR FEATURED LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Hotshot: Harlequins and England U20 fly-half Ellie Green

first_imgIt’s not just Harlequins’ men’s team that have a teenage No 10 – find out more about the women’s playmaker Ellie Green When did you link up with Harlequins? I’d done a few camps when I was younger and I was registered after my 17th birthday (you have to be at least 17 to play in the Premier 15s). I played my first game off the bench at Darlington Mowden Park in February. The first couple of tackles were a bit of a shock to the system!How did you find touring with England U20 this summer? It was an amazing experience, especially being so young in that environment. We had a buddy system and Zoe Harrison taught me so much. She’s been through the U20 set-up and is now a proper Red Rose, so it was really helpful.Who’s been the biggest influence on your career? I’d say my dad and my brother. My dad, Graham, from a coaching perspective and my brother, Harry, who had to quit rugby through illness and is very inspirational to me.What are your goals for this season? To keep playing in the Premier 15s and pushing forward with my development. I’m still young and have so much more to experience, in U20s and Premier 15s, so I want to learn off everyone.RW VERDICT: Quins’ men’s and women’s teams are both favouring teenage fly-halves, and Green, who is studying for A Levels in maths, biology and PE, will benefit long term from bossing around internationals each weekend. Harlequins and England U20 fly-half Ellie Green Date of Birth 21 Jan 2001 Born Epsom, Surrey Club Harlequins Country England Position Fly-halfHow did you get involved in rugby? I have an older brother and sister, and they played from a very young age, and my dad was coach, so it was a rite of passage for me. I started at Sutton & Epsom.Have you always been a ten? I started in the forwards as a second-row and No 8 when I played mixed rugby. Then when I got into U13 girls, I realised I could kick quite well so I moved to fly-half.I had to move to Beccehamians as that was the nearest girls’ set-up that had a full team and played regular matches.Did you play other sports?I played hockey at school and for Surrey U15. It was a toss-up between hockey and rugby, but I realised rugby was the best sport for me. I like the family feel of rugby and when you’re on the pitch you have to rely on other people.Who were your childhood heroes? When I was 13 I went to the (Women’s) World Cup final in France and watching England win I thought, ‘This is where I want to be in ten years’.It’s great to play with some of those players and against some of them now in the Premier 15s. This article originally appeared in the November 2018 edition of Rugby World.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Harlequins Rising star: Ellie Green kicks for goal for Harlequins (Getty Images) last_img read more

Japan 2019 Travel Guide: Takachiho

first_img Rock and row: The impressive Takachiho Gorge Chicken nanban – fried and served with tartar sauce – is another speciality of the Miyazaki Prefecture. Kamairicha tea is too.The Adventurer Takachiho Gorge is a narrow chasm cut through the rock by the Gokase River. The nearly sheer cliffs lining the gorge are made of slow-forming volcanic basalt columns from the lava flow of Mount Aso and they resemble the scales of a dragon as the stone has twisted as it formed.You can hire a boat to row down the river so you can see the Manai Falls and the cliffs up close. There is also a 1km-long walking path along the gorge that offers fantastic scenery.While the Takachiho Railway stopped running in 2008, there is a ‘Super Cart’ that takes tourists on a 30-minute trip along the tracks, from which you can see terraced rice fields, enjoy the light displays in the tunnel and take in the magnificent view from the Takachiho Bridge, which is 105 metres high.Dance ritual: Takachiho-no-Yokagura is a 33-part Shinto danceThe Party Animal Takachiho-no-Yokagura is a 33-part theatrical Shinto dance dedicated to Ujigami-sama (a local god) from November to February. Throughout the year, you can watch a performance from 8-9pm at the Takachiho Shrine Kagura-den Hall that includes the dances of Tajikarao, Uzume and Totori – all based on Iwato mythology – as well as Goshintai, the dance of a married couple.For more travel information…takachiho-kanko.info/en/ LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS How to get thereThe town is 90 minutes by bus from JR Nobeoka station, which is two hours from Oita or one hour from Miyazaki. Get off at the Takachiho Bus Centre stop. Or it’s three hours by bus from Kumamoto. This Kyushu town is steeped in Japanese mythology TAGS: Japan Advertising FeatureJapan 2019 Travel Guide: TakachihoLocated in the north of the Miyazaki Prefecture, Takachiho is famed for its beautiful gorge and spiritual experiences…The Culture Vulture One of the best-known legends of Japanese mythology centres on Takachiho. The tale is of Amaterasu, the Shinto sun goddess, and how her brother’s pranks led to her hiding in a cave and depriving the world of her light. It wasn’t until another goddess’s dance caused others to laugh that Amaterasu emerged to see what was happening.You cannot visit the cave in which she was said to have hidden, but there is a viewing deck at the Amano Iwato Shrine where you can look across to the side of the Iwato River where the cave is located.Stuff of legend: The Amano Yasukawara shrineThere is also a path to Amano Yasukawara, a shrine in a cave said to be where the other gods and goddesses met to discuss how to lure Amaterasu out.The town of Takachiho is also known as a ‘power spot’, a place of profound religious importance and natural beauty which radiates spiritual energy.The Foodie Somen is a thin, white Japanese noodle made from wheat flour – and there is a unique way to eat them here. Nagashi-somen means the noodles flow down a bamboo pipe that has been cut in half, then diners catch some of the noodles and dip them in a Japanese soup. Try them at the restaurant Chiho-No-le – it’s a real test of your skills with chopsticks!Food flow: Nagashi-somen are noodles that flow down a bamboo pipeTakachiho beef is a local speciality and was awarded the Prime Minister’s Prize at the ninth National Wagyu Beef Capability Association – known as the ‘Wagyu Olympics’ – in 2007. Takachiho beef is popular for being marbled and tender, and is an ingredient in the Takachiho croquette.last_img read more

Libby Lane named as Church of England’s first female bishop

first_imgLibby Lane named as Church of England’s first female bishop December 17, 2014 at 6:04 pm Becomng bishopess of an increasingly beside the point church is almost as good as becoming Captain of RMS Titanic. Don McCleary says: Featured Events JAN rOGOZINSKI says: Anglican Communion, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Victoria Spiegel says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Rev. Daniel Velez-Rivera says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Charles Jett says: December 17, 2014 at 5:51 pm This has been such a long time coming.Thanks be to God!The Reverend Daniel Velez-Rivera said it better than I ever could.Yes, Bishop Lane is a real Christmas gift for the Anglican Communion,and more specifically the Church of England! Myron B. Hawkins says: Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Posted Dec 17, 2014 December 18, 2014 at 11:56 am Or her own as the case may be. Maybe this will bring us closer together in the future. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN December 19, 2014 at 12:42 am I don’t know….for a “beside the point church,” the past ten plus years have seen the Anglican Communion navigate through those “icicles” by generally remaining centrist in reference to the key social/religious/political issues that have been hot topics overall. Is everyone happy all the time with this approach? No, and that’s the point…..dialogue, compromise, and reflection among conservative/orthodox, liberal/progressive, and moderate factions are the keys to the Communion’s survival.Case in point: Bishop Lane. Those of us with a bit of common sense applaud that the Church of England has finally decided to take a step backward — to reflect on the foundations of Jesus-centered Christianity and the eventual historical/social/political consequences of male chauvinism/superiority-based Christianity (I’m going to assume that your use of the term “bishopess” correlates to the common Anglican term for a female deacon/archdeacon, “deaconess,” and that you’re not being snarky and pompous) — and start the process to address and correct those negatives.Of course, the CoE still has plenty of “David Hortons” lol. However, like Mr. Horton, eventually perceiving and interacting with female priests in a realistic and practical light illustrates that they aren’t so bad after all…. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS martha knight says: Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Women’s Ministry Myron B. Hawkins says: December 17, 2014 at 11:17 pm “Would that all the people of God were able to see the image of God reflected in their ordained and lay leaders, and to see themselves reflected as well.”But there is more to it than genitalia. What I look for is someone who shares my total commitment to sanctification. If such a person existed in the Episcopalian denomination, I would not care if her skin color were blue with little green dots.I am sure the new bishop will do no worse a job as an administrator than a male person would. But her female genitalia do not add anything to her skills. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Anne Bay says: December 19, 2014 at 12:38 pm The first sentence in my opinion should read “should not be done, etc. “ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anne Bay says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service December 17, 2014 at 7:35 pm For the record: My message (above) regarding the history of the Diocese of Chester and its two suffragan bishops was written in response to a message from Father Phil Hughes reflecting confusion from an earlier wording of the article about Libby Lane becoming both a suffragan Bishop of Chester and Bishop of Stockport.Apparently the ENS editors revised the opening of the article for clarification and dropped the message from Father Hughes — which left my message appearing to reply to and concur with remarks by Joseph F. Foster referring to Bishop-to-be Lane as “bishopess,” to a “beside the point church,” and to the Titanic.I do not agree with or support Mr. Foster’s remark. Women becoming bishops in the Church of England is long overdue. I sincerely hope that the expanding involvement of women in the top leadership echelons of the C of E will make it increasingly difficult in the coming years to characterize the C of E as “beside the point.” Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 December 18, 2014 at 12:32 am Finally! I know the British don’t move too fast! But they are coming along. Good news! Here in the Diocese of Los Angeles we have had two women Bishops for a long time! More women will be consecrated bishops as the years go along. The bottom line is there shouldn’t be any male or female selectivity in jobs, including the church. People should be selected for their education, experience, and what they bring to the job. Period. thankfully the young people are wise to the old folks quoting parts of the bible to manipulate things to be done a certain way. I don’t know too many young people going to church, but even for us older folks, glad to see this. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis center_img Michael R. Scullary says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Joseph F Foster says: Rector Bath, NC December 17, 2014 at 8:07 am This is an awesome moment for the entire Anglican Communion. Many blessings to the Reverend Lane as she begins her episcopacy and to her family as well. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books December 19, 2014 at 12:37 pm Frankly speaking, what we do in the Anglican Communion should be be done with any thought on how this affects other parts of Christianity, including the Roman Catholic Church. The old guard of the RCC from what we have seen in the U.S. has little understanding of women’s anatomy or any interest in learning about women’s anatomy and causing a lot of misinformation on it and as a result, has put women’s health in a precarious and needless potential danger. The HollyHobbie company being allowed to not cover contraception for its employees is only one of a myriad of dangerous health policies for women and pushed by the RCC and conservative religious groups. The refusal of the RCC to stand up against discrimination toward the LGBT community is very scary and downright wrong also. The old cardinals in the Vatican having a melt-down when the RCC nuns are given any positions that are ones that only men should have-ie. the president of a RCC university in the U.S. , and the list goes on……all clearly show the RCC is stuck in the middle ages. And that’s too bad, but the Anglican Church doesn’t have to be and it’s 2014 and time to be aware of modern science and get away from the ridiculousness of male superiority in all phases of modern life, church included. My husband was forced to go to the RCC in his family of origin and as soon as he turned legal age, has never returned, and the older I get, the more I see why. Thankfully am a lifelong Episcopalian and the churches I was in all were in the here and now, not the then and then. Although, the Episcopal church dragged its feet for women’s ordination to the priesthood, eventually it did and the church is so much better for it. I can’t believe people accept men only ordination to the priesthood/bishops in this day and age. My mother said the Anglican church encourages to use your brain, and that’s what the Anglican church needs to do. Forget what other churches do. Also, my husband said another 300 years and the RCC will make some changes, and maybe ordain women. Who knows. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Libby Lane smiles as her forthcoming appointment as the new bishop of Stockport (a suffragan bishop in the Diocese of Chester) is announced in the Town Hall in Stockport, northern England, Dec. 17, 2014. Lane will become the Church of England’s first female bishop. Photo: REUTERS/Phil NobleEditors’ note: Story updated at 11:40 EST Dec. 17 with statement from Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori[Church of England press release] Downing Street has announced that the new bishop of Stockport – and the first female bishop in the Church of England – will be the Rev. Libby Lane, currently vicar of St. Peter’s, Hale, and St. Elizabeth’s, Ashley.As bishop of Stockport she will serve as a suffragan (assistant) bishop in the Diocese of Chester. She will be consecrated as the eighth bishop of Stockport at a ceremony at York Minister on Jan. 26, 2015.Lane was ordained as a priest in 1994 and has served a number of parish and chaplaincy roles in the north of England in the dioceses of Blackburn, York and Chester. For the past eight years she has served as vicar of St. Peter’s and St. Elizabeth’s.She is one of eight clergy women from the Church of England elected as Participant Observers in the House of Bishops, as the representative from the dioceses of the north west.Speaking at Stockport Town Hall, where she was announced as the new bishop of Stockport, Lane said: “I am grateful for, though somewhat daunted by, the confidence placed in me by the Diocese of Chester. This is unexpected and very exciting. On this historic day as the Church of England announces the first woman nominated to be bishop, I am very conscious of all those who have gone before me, women and men, who for decades have looked forward to this moment. But most of all I am thankful to God.“The church faces wonderful opportunities, to proclaim afresh, in this generation, the good news of Jesus and to build His kingdom. The Church of England is called to serve all the people of this country, and being present in every community, we communicate our faith best when our lives build up the lives of others, especially the most vulnerable. I am excited by the possibilities and challenges ahead.”Responding to news of the announcement, Archbishop of York John Sentamu, said: “It is with great joy that on January 26, 2015 – the feast of Timothy and Titus, companions of Paul – I will be in York Minster, presiding over the consecration of the Rev. Libby Lane as bishop suffragan of Stockport. Libby brings a wealth of experience in parish ministry, in hospital and FE chaplaincy, in vocations work and the nurture of ordinands. I am delighted that she will exercise her episcopal ministry with joy, prayerfulness, and trust in God.Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said: “I am absolutely delighted that Libby has been appointed to succeed Bishop Robert Atwell as bishop of Stockport. Her Christ-centered life, calmness and clear determination to serve the church and the community make her a wonderful choice.“She will be bishop in a diocese that has been outstanding in its development of people, and she will make a major contribution. She and her family will be in my prayers during the initial excitement, and the pressures of moving.”Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said the church gives thanks for Lane’s appointment. “We give thanks for her ministry and that of so many other women in the Church of England, and pray that others will soon be named as bishops in other sees,” Jefferts Schori said.  “Would that all the people of God were able to see the image of God reflected in their ordained and lay leaders, and to see themselves reflected as well.”Bishop of Chester Peter Forster said: “Libby has had a varied and distinguished ministry, and is currently a first-rate parish priest. She has already demonstrated her ability to contribute nationally through her representative role in the House of Bishops, on behalf of the northwest England dioceses.“As the first woman bishop in the Church of England she will face many challenges as well as enjoying many opportunities to be an ambassador for Jesus Christ. I have no doubt that she has the gifts and determination to be an outstanding bishop.“I am delighted at her designation as bishop of Stockport after a lengthy process of discernment across the Church of England and beyond.”The nomination of Lane as the new bishop of Stockport was approved by the Queen and announced Dec. 17. Lane succeeds the Rt. Rev. Robert Atwell, who is now the bishop of Exeter.Biographical DetailsLibby Lane has been the vicar of St Peter’s Hale and St Elizabeth’s Ashley, in the Diocese of Chester, since April 2007, and from January 2010 has also been Dean of Women in Ministry for the diocese. After school in Manchester and university at Oxford, she trained for ministry at Cranmer Hall in Durham. She was ordained a deacon in 1993 and a priest in 1994, serving her curacy in Blackburn, Lancashire.Prior to moving to Hale, Lane was team vicar in the Stockport South West Team, and assistant diocesan director of ordinands in the Diocese of Chester, advising and supporting those considering a vocation to ministry in the church. She continues to be a bishop’s selection adviser.Lane has served in the Diocese of York, as chaplain in hospital and further education, and as family life officer for the Committee for Social Responsibility in the Diocese of Chester.She is one of eight clergy women from the Church of England elected as Participant Observers in the House of Bishops, as the representative from the dioceses of the north west.Her husband, George, is also a priest; they were one of the first married couples in the Church of England to be ordained together. George is coordinating chaplain at Manchester Airport, licensed in the Diocese of Manchester. They have two grown up children in higher education.Her interests include being a school governor, encouraging social action initiatives, learning to play the saxophone, supporting Manchester United, reading and doing cryptic crosswords.Resources available:A video statement by the Rev. Libby Lane on her appointment is available from the Diocese of Chester Website here (Chester Diocese YouTube channel is available here).An audio interview with the Rev. Libby Lane on today’s announcement is available as part of a Church of England podcast here.A photostream from today’s announcement including photos of the Rev. Libby Lane are available here. Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Myron B. Hawkins says: December 17, 2014 at 8:01 pm So delighted for the Anglican Communion. December 17, 2014 at 8:19 am Alleluia!!! The choir of angels sing! This announcement is a wonderful Christmas gift for the Anglican Communion and for the world!! ¡¡Bendciones y paz Rvda. Libby Lane!!! Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest December 18, 2014 at 9:12 pm I wondered how long it would be before someone checked me on that.Unfortunately, in the case of the RCC, “his own” is the only way it will happen for any foreseeable future. In fact I think it likely that the practice of ordaining women as priests and consecrating them as bishops will if anything constitute an obstacle to bringing the Anglican Communion and the RCC together to the point of intercommunion.Progress is already being made toward giving women positions of leadership and responsibility at parish, diocesan and even Vatican levels. One can only hope that gradually this may yield fruit in a broader perspective that will at last overcome current male-only clericalism. It’s something to dream on … and pray for. December 21, 2014 at 9:53 am Great points, Ms. Bay! With the current pontiff, as well as the diverse geographical social and political aspects of the RCC, it will be interesting to see not only how long it take that denomination, but the other Orthodox churches (they even allow their priests to marry) as well.Coincidentally, I’m sure you are aware that there is already a RCC “splinter group” started by nuns that were ordained as deacons/priests/bishops. Considering that the nuns generally run the show anyway, I’d say this was a smart move lol Michael R. Scullary says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Comments (15) December 17, 2014 at 5:17 pm I thought the same thing and was therefore similarly confused.Read the Wikipedia article on the Diocese of Chester, which is of ancient origin and has had a very confused history and lineage. It will explain what the Bishop of Stockport has to do with the Diocese of Chester.Seems the Diocese of Chester has two suffragan bishops, one of whom is the Bishop of Birkenhead and the other is the Bishop of Stockport.I wonder if this situation isn’t similar to the Roman Catholic practice of an auxiliary bishop (the Roman equivalent of a suffragan) being named as “Titular Bishop” of some ancient (no longer extant) see — which title is held until the auxiliary bishop later is given a “real” diocese of his own. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Anne Bay says: Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Church in Burundi responds to people displaced by political tension

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted May 20, 2015 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Refugees Migration & Resettlement Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Church in Burundi responds to people displaced by political tension Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [Anglican Alliance] Recent political tensions in Burundi have increased uncertainty and fear of violence, leading to displacement in the country, with more than 100,000 people reported to have fled in recent days. The Church in Burundi is calling for prayers for peace, while it also responds to the needs of vulnerable people.After several weeks of political tension, the situation escalated last week with an attempted coup and struggle over control of Bujumbura, the capital of Burundi. The tensions began when President Pierre Nkurunziza announced that he would stand for a third term as president in elections at the end of June. The constitution limits the presidential tenure to two terms.Recent weeks have seen violent street protests and a large exodus of people leaving the country concerned for their safety. This is considered the worst outbreak of violence since the civil war ended in 2005.Last week’s events have resulted in a huge increase in displacement as people flee in fear. A UNHCR report on Friday, May 15, shows 105,000 people have left the country, with 70,000 refugees in Tanzania alone.Oxfam reports that “new arrivals cite fear of violence and intimidation as primary reasons for leaving. Tens of thousands are in urgent need of clean water, adequate sanitation, health care, food and shelter. Without these basic needs being met, the risk of disease spreading among new arrivals is dangerously high.”The Anglican Church in Burundi is among the Christian Aid partners that are preparing to respond to the needs of people affected by the ongoing situation in Burundi. Christian Aid reports that partners are now assessing the needs on the ground and coordinating their response. They have received funding to work alongside communities to support them to prepare local contingency plans that can be activated in the event of a crisis.Christian Aid Country Manager for Burundi, James Robinson, said: “The situation is very volatile and things are tense in and around Bujumbura particularly. Many people have been staying indoors, not moving because of the threat of gunfire, wondering what will happen next. People are scared to leave their homes.“Since the demonstrations began life for many Burundians has been paralyzed, with local trade, transport and public services all affected. As the protests continue, stocks of goods such as petrol, food, medicine and water are becoming scarce. Any further disruption threatens to leave communities both insecure and without essential items. With the high levels of poverty in the country, it’s the poorest who are the least able to cope.”Before the attempted coup last week, Bishop Eraste Bigirimana of Bujumbura had already asked for prayers as the situation was becoming worse in Bujumbura city. Most of the offices and shops are now closed. Many people have been killed, others seriously injured and admitted to hospital. Five hundred are in jail, thousands have fled the country. “We are now receiving a big number of people, especially children, coming to our home seeking for security and protection,” Bigirimana says.Mothers’ Union President Mathilde Nkwirikiye also asks for continued prayers, for tolerance and for discernment of God’s will for His people. Nkwirikiye has already taken in several children evacuated from the Rainbow Centre where the foster families are living in the danger zones, with other members doing likewise. The Rainbow Centre is planning a wider response to support vulnerable children during this uncertain period. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Anglican Communion, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Africa, Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

A growing vision in Seattle’s Green Lake neighborhood

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Rector Albany, NY Church-Community Agriculture Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Editor’s note: This is the latest in a continuing series about Episcopal Church congregations that are involved in community agriculture. Other stories in the series can be found here.[Episcopal News Service – Seattle, Washington] Any urban Episcopal Church congregation that thinks it does not have enough green space for community gardening could learn a lesson from St. Andrew’s here.Along the way, those congregations would also learn about an integrated effort to reduce the parish’s carbon footprint.“We’re trying to be a model,” said J.B. Hoover, parishioner and garden volunteer. “An urban parish can do something. It’s not limited to a suburban or rural parish that has a lot of land.”Approaching St. Andrew’s front side shows a mid-1950s A-frame-style building overlooking the Interstate 5 Expressway in Seattle’s Green Lake neighborhood. The building’s west and south sides reveal a different story. Two small terraced gardens flank the side street stairs into the church. In the side yard between the church and the house next door, owned by St. Andrew’s, are some old City of Seattle Green Cones for recycling food waste. Volunteers are transforming the house’s backyard from what had been an over-grown mess. Now, there is a terraced garden, a four-level composting system and some compost storage bins recently built by a fledgling Eagle Scout.J.B. Hoover, a St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church member and garden volunteer, shows some vacation Bible school participants how the squash is doing. Photo: St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church via FacebookLast year, the gardens yielded about 600 pounds of food, most of which went into the parish’s own food ministries. These include a monthly community dinner known as Jubilee Supper and the Teen Feed Ministry whose participants supply a hot meal for homeless teens in a university-area church. Hoover acknowledges that not all congregations with gardening ministries keep the food they grow, instead donating it to food pantries, but St. Andrew’s wants to conserve resources.“We don’t spend energy taking it off to another place and then going out and buying food for our own food ministry outreach,” he said.That effort points to the parish’s goal of making its carbon footprint as small as possible. Forty percent of its food waste and 90 percent of the garden waste is composted. The composting begins with an organized waste plan to ensure what Hoover calls “high compliance rates” for recycling throughout the building. Clearly labeled bins are placed near where waste is generated so that parishioners don’t have to go find the bins.For instance, Hoover and the Rev. Peter Strimer, the former rector, designed two carts for the parish hall that each have individual bins for trash, food waste and other compostable items, and recyclables. People clearing tables wheel the carts along and sort as they clean. In the kitchen, a composting bucket is labeled to explain in a yes-no fashion what goes into the compost and what goes elsewhere.The food waste is destined for those Green Cones in the side yard. Hoover says the City of Seattle once subsidized people to buy the cones to compost in their own yards until the city turned to a different disposal method. St. Andrew’s volunteers got some cones for free and began composting. Months of layering torn-up cardboard with food scraps creates a friendly environment for some helpers in the process. “The worms just go crazy so we have great worm production,” said Hoover.St. Andrew’s composting is not just about recycling as much waste on-site as possible. The resulting mulch is crucial to the garden’s success because all gardens need to be fed. “If churches take this seriously they have to understand that a lot of your time and effort goes into soil building and composting,” Hoover said.Water is another ingredient for nurturing gardens and, contrary to the “it’s always rainy in Seattle” stereotype, water can be hard to come by. “Water is tremendously expensive here if you are buying it from the city,” Hoover said. “And we get almost no rain in the summer. We’re drier than Tucson, Arizona, in the summertime.”To help conserve water, St. Andrew’s recently received a $550 grant for a drip irrigation system from the Diocese of Olympia’s Bishop’s Committee for the Environment. The parish also conserves water by recycling a ubiquitous byproduct of Seattle’s coffee scene: burlap bags that once held coffee beans make a great mulching layer.“One thing I really like about this garden is that it never cost St. Andrew’s one dime. We’ve been fully self-sufficient,” Hoover said. “We’ve been able to do that through grants and a little entrepreneurial spirit of selling compost and things like that.”Not all of St. Andrew’s environmental efforts take place on the ground. Its Creation Keepers group, which coordinates the parish’s care of creation, has been instrumental in bringing solar panels to the church roof and advocating for the Diocese of Olympia to divest from fossil fuels.Creation Keepers and the garden volunteers hope to encourage their fellow parishioners and their neighbors to try to emulate their work. The visibility of a squash garden growing on the narrow strip of land between the street and the sidewalk invites conversation between volunteers and passersby. Sometimes visitors pick the squash. “We lose a lot of squash in the course of the year; that’s fine,” said Hoover. “It allows us to have the greater community connection.”The nearby stairway gardens are terraced using a composite material called Trex. While St. Andrew’s might be expected to use wood dividers, Hoover said he explains to inquirers that the artificial material, while expensive at the outset, lasts longer and can be bent to accommodate garden space that doesn’t run in straight lines.Rows of wine bottles, thought to transfer the sun’s warmth and heat the soil, line a garden bed at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Seattle. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceAnother conversation starter is the empty wine bottles stuck neck-first into the soil on the lower edge of one terrace. A parishioner heard on the local public radio station about gardeners who believe that if they “plant” the bottles, they can begin their growing season earlier and extend it later into the fall because the bottles heat up in the sunshine and transfer that warmth to the soil.“I really haven’t noticed a significant difference,” said Hoover, but their presence in the garden makes for good conversations. “And it gives the members of the parish an excuse to drink wine: they’re preparing for the next bed.”St. Andrew’s model also shows that “for this kind of work to succeed, you really need a team,” according to Hoover. “One person does not have all the skills that are necessary for this to work well.”People with organizational skills to mesh the volunteers with the work that is being done must work with folks who understand the more technical side but who might not be skilled at organizing. People to document the work and communicate its success are also needed. Food ministry cooks need to work with the gardeners to use produce as it ripens and understand what guests do and don’t like.“That’s a struggle for us to be able to get all of that working well,” Hoover said. “It takes time and you’ve got to have a lot of patience.”And you have to be flexible and willing to admit it when you make a mistake. For instance, a few years ago, Hoover was convinced by a parishioner to grow cabernet franc grapes with the thought that eventually they might yield sacramental wine. However, it turns out that red wine grapes cannot be grown west of the Cascade Mountains. Hoover plans to switch to table grapes and is planting plum trees, contemplating plum wine on the altar.You have to work with the resources that you have, he said, and then “the vision just keeps growing as more people are involved.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA A growing vision in Seattle’s Green Lake neighborhood St. Andrew’s works to model stepping lightly upon the earth Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Aug 11, 2016 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Servicelast_img read more

Presiding Bishop Michael Curry preaches in Zimbabwe at Mizeki festival

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC [Episcopal News Service] Presiding Bishop Michael Curry delivered a sermon June 17 in Zimbabwe while attending an annual festival for the martyred 19th century missionary Bernard Mizeki. More than 15,000 pilgrims from across Central and Southern Africa attended the festival and heard Curry preach. You can watch video of the sermon below. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Video Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tagscenter_img Presiding Bishop Michael Curry preaches in Zimbabwe at Mizeki festival Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Africa, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Posted Jul 17, 2017 Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more