Wallsend Touch Football Clinic

first_imgThe representatives will be sharing what they’ve learnt throughout their time in Touch Football on Tuesday, 19 April 2011 when they run a Touch Football Clinic at Wallsend Touch Fields. The clinic will run from 9.00am until 3.00pm.For more information, please click on the following attachment. Related Fileswallsend_-_world_cup_touch_clinic_2011_1__01-pdflast_img

10 months agoHE’S BACK! Fergie on Man Utd training pitch today with Solskjaer

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say HE’S BACK! Fergie on Man Utd training pitch today with Solskjaerby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Manchester United boss Sir Alex Ferguson will be on the training pitch with Ole Gunnar Solskjaer today.The Daily Mail says Ferguson is expected at United’s training ground on Saturday after Solskjaer invited his mentor to visit him at the club.Ferguson will be greeted by Solskjaer and his coaching staff at Carrington as United prepare for Sunday’s game at home to Bournemouth.Ferguson is believed to have had a say in the decision to appoint Solskjaer as caretaker boss on loan from Molde until the end of the season alongside his old No 2 Mike Phelan.The former United striker acknowledged Ferguson’s influence over his career as a player and manager when he started the job last week. last_img read more

Anonymous Missouri Player Says Players And Coaches Divided On Boycott: “If We Were 9-0 This Wouldn’t Be Happening”

first_imgMissouri stand together in support of players strike.Twitter/@GaryPinkelNot every member of the Missouri football program is thrilled with the team’s boycott in response to racial issues on campus. An anonymous Mizzou player tells ESPN’s Brett McMurphy that the team and coaching staff is very split on the issue, and that if the Tigers had a better record, they would not be taking this course of action.Mizzou player tells @ESPN, MU players & coaches “are pissed (about halting football practices). If we were 9-0 this wouldn’t be happening.”— Brett McMurphy (@McMurphyESPN) November 9, 2015McMurphy has more on how the team is handling the week in preparation for BYU, should the game occur.Monday are regular off days for the football team and the coaches told the players to watch film on their own iPads and keep preparing for Saturday’s game against BYU in Kansas City, the player said.The player indicated they had been aware of Butler’s hunger strike for several days. However, some black players didn’t decide to take any action until Butler met with some players Saturday night.“Not everyone agrees with the decision (to stop all football activities),” the player said. “Most people are pissed, including the black guys (on the team).”Earlier today, the athletic department expressed support for the team’s decision, and Mizzou took a team photo to show solidarity. Even so, it shouldn’t come as a major surprise that this nearly-unprecedented decision does not have unanimous support within the team. It will be very interesting to see how the team proceeds as we near game day.[ESPN]last_img read more

Miss Lou Exhibition Opens at Kingston and St. Andrew Parish Library

first_imgThe late Louise Bennett Coverley (Miss Lou) has been hailed an important cultural icon, whose work transcended barriers and changed the way the world saw Jamaica.Interim Executive Director of the Jamaica Cultural Development Commission (JCDC), Orville Hill, said Miss Lou is a significant contributor “to Jamaica’s valid social documentary reflecting the way Jamaicans think, feel and live”.He noted that she is the “only poet who has spoken the truth about our society, in our own language”.“Through her poems, she was able to traction all the spontaneity and expressions of Jamaicans in respect of our joys and our sorrows, our religion and the philosophy of life that we live and so dearly cherish,” he said. “Her writings, which transcend poetry to include short stories, songs and scripts, changed the way people saw Jamaica and Jamaicans; her dialect captured the culture of Jamaican people,” he noted further.Mr. Hill said that Miss Lou was only 14 years old when she wrote her first dialect, and her writings, which included short stories, songs and scripts “changed the way people saw Jamaica and Jamaicans, and her dialect captured the culture of the Jamaican people”.He was speaking at the unveiling of an exhibition on the life and work of Miss Lou at the Kingston and St Andrew Parish Library on Thursday (September 7) to mark the 98th anniversary of her birth.Senior Librarian, Kingston and St. Andrew Parish Library, Debbie Bonnick, said the facility was happy to partner with the JCDC in staging the exhibition.“The collaboration is timely because the Jamaica Library Service is also tasked to promote authentic and transformational culture, and who is more authentic than Miss Lou,” she contended.The exhibit will remain open to the public throughout September. The JCDC has partnered with parish libraries across the island to stage similar displays during the month.The opening ceremony featured a bandana fashion show, showcasing the national fabric, which Miss Lou popularised, and renditions of poems written by the cultural icon.last_img read more

HapagLloyd to Issue Fines for Misdeclared Hazardous Cargoes

first_imgzoomIllustration; Source: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license German shipping major Hapag-Lloyd revealed its plans to implement a penalty of USD 15,000 per container for misdeclared hazardous cargoes.The company said that the measure would be effective as of September 15, 2019, and was introduced “in the overall interest of safe operation onboard.”The move comes on the back of a major incident that occurred on one of the company’s containerships earlier this year. The 7,510 TEU vessel Yantian Express suffered a fire while sailing some 650 nautical miles off the Canadian coast in January 2019. A month later, the Yantian Express berthed in Freeport, Bahamas, for an evaluation process and cargo discharge preparation.Hapag-Lloyd explained that, in order to ensure the safety of its crew, ships and other cargo onboard, it holds the shipper liable and responsible for all costs and consequences related to violations, fines, damages, incidents, claims and corrective measures resulting from cases of undeclared or misdeclared cargoes.last_img read more

Wicked women are just women who are tired of injustice abuse Angelina

first_imgNew York: Angelina Jolie wants the world to have more “wicked women”. The Hollywood star, in an op-ed for Elle magazine, goes on to redefine the labels often used to brand women as “unnatural” and “dangerous”, saying the term “wicked” today should be used for those women who are tired of injustice and are not ready to give up their voice and rights. “Since time immemorial, women who rebel against what is considered normal by society-even unintentionally-have been labelled as unnatural, weird, wicked, and dangerous. What is surprising is the extent to which this kind of myth and prejudice has persisted throughout the centuries and still colours the world we live in,” Jolie wrote. Also Read – I have personal ambitions now: Priyanka The actor-humanitarian reflected on how often women who run for political office in democratic countries are described as witches. “Bring together a group of strong women, and before too long someone will brand them a ‘coven’ the technical term, to be clear, for a gathering of witches meeting at night to consort with the devil. Women who stand up for human rights in many countries are still labelled ‘deviant’, ‘bad mothers’, ‘difficult’ or ‘loose’,” she wrote. Also Read – Salman Khan remembers actor Vinod Khanna Jolie, 44, said the accusation of witchcraft has been used to control and silence women in almost all societies and in every century. “Women could be accused of witchcraft for having an independent sex life, for speaking their mind on politics or religion, or for dressing differently. Had I lived in earlier times, I could have been burnt at the stake many times over for simply being myself.” In her personal life, when the actor started dating Brad Pitt, she was called names like the “homewrecker” and “the other woman” for breaking up her “Mr and Mrs Smith” co-star’s marriage with actor Jennifer Aniston, with Pitt let off easily in a well-publicised Hollywood scandal. After 12 years of relationship and two years of marriage, Jolie filed for divorce from Pitt in 2016. The actor, who is an UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador, added that her essay was not an attempt to “dismiss or downplay” the abuse against men and boys. “But looking across the world, we have to ask, Why is so much energy expended to keep women in a secondary position?” she asked. Jolie then attempted to yield a new connotation to the term “wicked women”. “Looked at in this light, ‘wicked women’ are just women who are tired of injustice and abuse. Women who refuse to follow rules and codes they don’t believe are best for themselves or their families. “Women who won’t give up on their voice and rights, even at the risk of death or imprisonment or rejection by their families and communities. If that is wickedness, then the world needs more wicked women,” she wrote. The actor, who will next be seen reprising her role as the eponymous antagonist in “Maleficent: Mistress of Evil”, said there is nothing more attractive than a woman with an independent will and her own opinions. “With love to all the wicked women and the men who understand them,” she ended the essay on a hopeful note.last_img read more

Cool weather continues to help firefighters working the Tommy Lake Fire

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The cool weather continues to help firefighters working the Tommy Lakes Forest Fire.While the fire remains 20% contained, there was no growth of the fire on Friday even though the fire did not receive any rain. The cooler temperatures and higher relative humidity continue to aid fire suppression efforts.There are 216 firefighters building and reinforcing guard working to increase containment supported by 9 helicopters along with 20 pieces of heavy equipment. The Peace River Regional District has lifted the evacuation alert for a small area near the fire.The size of the fire decreased from 22,659 hectares to 22,583 due to more accurate maps.last_img

RCMP release new photos of the people found dead near Liard River

first_imgFORT NELSON, B.C. – The RCMP have released new photos of the two people found dead south of the Liard River Hotsprings.International media shared the identity of the two victims early Friday and now the RCMP have confirmed the two people found dead are Chynna Noelle Deese of the United States and Lucas Robertson Fowler of Australia. Lucas is the son of New South Wales Police Chief Inspector Stephen Fowler, and the Fowler family is travelling to Northern B.C. to bring their son home. Lucas Fowler and Chynna Deese were found deceased on the Alaska Highway 20 kilometres south of Liard Hot Springs on Monday, July 15, 2019. Police would like to speak to anyone that may have travelled this stretch of highway between Sunday, July 14, 2019, at 4:00 PM and Monday, July 15, 2019, at 8:00 AM.Police would especially like to speak with anyone who may have a Dashcam video while travelling that area.A vehicle an older blue minivan with Alberta plates was found at the scene and police would like to speak with anyone who may have seen the vehicle or render assistance.Anyone with information is asked to contact the Northern Rockies RCMP at 250 774-2700 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.last_img read more

The Imperial Delhi stresses importance of hand hygiene

first_imgThe Imperial New Delhi joined hands with Hotel Association of India (HAI) to observe the 6th HAI Hand Hygiene Day by creating awareness amongst both associates and guests about the importance of hand hygiene.This year, the overarching theme for World Hand Hygiene Day by W.H.O was “Clean care for all – it’s in your hands”, focusing on the achievement of universal health coverage (UHC) which includes access to quality essential health care services, and access to safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all. Hand hygiene is critical to achieve UHC as it has a direct impact on the quality of care and patient safety across all levels of the health system. Also Read – The Puja carnivalIncorporating the same message, The Imperial conducted various activities to inculcate greater responsibility towards hand hygiene by engaging associates and creating substantial awareness about the issue. Speaking on the occasion, Vijay Wanchoo -Sr Executive VP and GM, The Imperial New Delhi said, “Hand hygiene is vital to a healthy lifestyle which is why we at The Imperial strive to maintain best practices and my aim is to promote initiatives like these so they reach the grass root level. When we are operating in the service industry it becomes our prerogative to prioritise health in every way which is why the message of clean hands as the foundation of a healthy system is reiterated every year in the hotel. Like last year, this year too, we had organised focused activities to emphasise on keeping hand hygiene at all times and shall continue to do so in near future to make our country aware, safe and healthy”. HAI intends to create awareness among the local communities, schools, orphanages, public institutions, guests, visitors and employees of hotels and the people who handle food by including them in a series of activities under the program. It aims to spread the importance of washing hands with soap and water or using a hand sanitiser as the simplest and most cost-effective way of promoting community health and well-being.last_img read more

Piracy in West Africa A bumpy road to maritime security

first_imgFor many people, the phrase maritime piracy evokes images of a one-eyed sailor drinking rum and singing obscene songs. For some younger people, piracy may bring to mind the picture of Hollywood actor Johnny Depp, wearing a headband in a scene from the film Pirates of the Caribbean. But maritime piracy is not just an action movie. The UN Convention on the Law of the Sea defines piracy as “illegal acts of violence or detention” committed on the high seas against ships or aircrafts. Piracy is a serious problem and it poses a real threat not only to the safety of vessels and their crews, but also to the economies of affected countries.In Africa, while piracy in Somalia’s Gulf of Aden is currently on the decline, it has spread to West Africa. Although most attacks in the region take place in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region, there have also been attacks in Benin, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Guinea and Togo, among others, according to the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). Reuters news agency reported that one such attack took place in October 2013 off Nigeria’s coast, where pirates attacked an oil supply vessel and kidnapped the captain and chief engineer, both American citizens,. The report says that “pirate attacks off Nigeria’s coast have jumped by a third this year as ships passing through West Africa’s Gulf of Guinea, a major commodities route, have increasingly come under threat from gangs wanting to snatch cargoes and crews.”Unlike pirates along Somalia’s coast, who are often only after ransom, pirates in West Africa also steal goods, particularly oil. Many attacks end up with crew members injured or killed. But pirate attacks do not only result in killings and injuries, tragic as those are; they also damage the economy. In some cases, affected countries in West Africa have become less concerned with direct losses from piracy than with the ways in which these losses affect international insurance rates and other trade-related costs.In Benin, for example, taxes on trade account for half of government revenue, and 80% of these are derived from the port of Cotonou, according to UNODC figures published in March 2013. Last year the spike in pirate attacks in West Africa led London-based Lloyd’s Market Association, an umbrella group of maritime insurers, to list Nigeria, neighboring Benin and nearby waters in the same risk category as Somalia, says Claims Journal, a magazine for insurance professionals. The result was a significant decrease in maritime traffic in the region, which meant a 28% loss in Benin’s government revenue. The decrease also affected the livelihoods of the country’s citizens, says UNODC, by increasing the cost of imports and decreasing the competitiveness of exports.According to Reuters, though ships now speed with armed guards on board through the dangerous waters off Somalia and the Horn of Africa on the east coast of the continent, many vessels have to anchor to do business with West African countries, with little protection. This makes them a soft target for criminals, says Reuters, and jacks up insurance costs.Corruption drives piracyAs is often the case, corruption, weak law enforcement and poverty are the main causes of piracy, according to Dr. Christian Bueger, a Cardiff University researcher and editor of Piracy-Studies.org, an online research portal. In an interview with Africa Renewal, Dr. Bueger said, “Piracy tends to be conducted or supported by marginalized communities that have not been participating in economic development.”This appears to be the case for Nigeria, for example, where the majority of the recent African pirate attacks have occurred, driven mainly by corruption in the oil sector. Chatham House, a British research group, reported in September 2013 that “corruption and fraud are rampant in the country’s oil sector,” and “lines between legal and illegal supplies of Nigerian oil can be blurry.” In such a climate pirates have an incentive to steal oil, since they know that they will be able to sell it on the black market.“Illegal bunkering [filling ships with fuel] is enormously profitable” in Nigeria, writes Martin Murphy, a professor at Georgetown University in Washington D.C. and a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council of the United States, a policy think tank,  in his article “Petro-Piracy: Oil and Troubled Waters,” published in Orbis for the Foreign Policy Research Institute. “The scale of losses is staggering—more than $100 billion worth of oil has gone missing since 1960,” says Professor Murphy.The damage caused by thieves has forced oil companies to shut down pipelines. Royal Dutch Shell is selling off four of its onshore Nigerian oil blocks because of the constant theft of large volumes of oil from its pipelines, United Press International reported in October 2013. As a result of the shutting down of pipelines, Nigeria is producing about 400,000 barrels a day below its capacity of 2.5 million barrels a day, according to the Economist, a British weekly.The New York Times reported in September 2013 that Nigeria’s former top anti-corruption official, Nuhu Ridabu, had written a report in 2012 charging that over the preceding decade, thieves had stolen between 6% and 30% of the country’s oil production.Countering piracy In his interview with Africa Renewal, Dr. Bueger suggested four steps to counter piracy. First, the key is for affected states to share information on what’s happening on their coastlines and their neighbours’. Second, joint training activities are required so countries can develop procedures and learn how to use technology. Training not only educates future generations of maritime security professionals, but also creates confidence and trust between different agencies. Third, states that face maritime and piracy challenges should develop strong legislation to prosecute criminals.And finally, states should set aside enough money to build local capacity. “Even if a state has the information, even if the state has well-trained coast guards, and even if the state has incorporated all the right laws,” Dr. Bueger explains, “without vessels, the state is powerless.” At the moment, of the states most affected by piracy, only South Africa and Nigeria have a professional navy. Most other countries have small and outdated coast guards with no more than three to five skiffs.What has been done?Several international legal instruments are in place to combat threats posed by piracy. The key agreement is the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, which prescribes exclusive economic zones over which individual states have the rights for exploration, energy production from water and wind, and the use of marine resources. For this agreement to be operative, states have to adopt and incorporate it into their national laws. All West African countries have signed and ratified the Law of the Sea Convention.However, the UN Security Council has yet to call for concerted international action against piracy along the Gulf of Guinea, as it did in the Somali case when, in June 2008, it authorized other countries to enter Somali territorial waters to stop pirates. In 2011 the council passed two resolutions expressing its concern about piracy in the Gulf of Guinea and urging states to reinforce domestic legislation, develop a comprehensive regional counter-piracy framework, issue appropriate guidance to shipping and cooperate in prosecuting pirates and their backers.Despite the absence of any Security Council action so far, and unlike in the Gulf of Aden, in West Africa there is already an institutional infrastructure to combat piracy. The Economic Community for West African States (ECOWAS) has in its treaty of 1993 a maritime component intended to harmonize all maritime issues across the region; the Maritime Organization of West and Central Africa, established in the 1970s, holds member countries to a similar agreement. Last year ECOWAS, the Gulf of Guinea Commission and the Economic Community of Central African States signed a memorandum of understanding between the International Maritime Organization and the Maritime Organization of West and Central Africa, to establish a subregional integrated coast guard network in West and Central Africa, among other things.Records show that despite these regional actions, the number of pirate attacks continues to increase. The International Maritime Bureau, a specialised division of the International Chamber of Commerce, reports that while pirate attacks (actual and attempted) in the Gulf of Guinea fell from 54 in 2008 to 37 in 2010, there has been a steady increase since then: 49 in 2011 and 58 in 2012. As of August 2013, there were 28 attacks in Nigeria alone. These numbers, however, might be deceptive because many attacks go unreported.But piracy is not the only security threat at sea. “Piracy has drawn attention to wider problems of maritime insecurity,” says Dr. Bueger, such as trafficking and smuggling of humans, weapons and narcotics, and illegal and unregulated fishing activities. Hence, he says, the attention currently being given to the fight against piracy could be used as a stepping stone by the international community to create sustainable institutions of maritime security.International institutions are crucial for counter-piracy efforts, but they require long-term commitment. The African Union has already declared that its objective is to implement the African Maritime Security Strategy by 2050. Among the strategy’s goals are to “ensure security and safety of maritime transportation systems,” and to “prevent hostile and criminal acts at sea, and to coordinate/harmonize the prosecution of the offenders.”It’s a long-term strategy, but without a doubt concerted action is needed now to stop piracy in West Africa before it deteriorates and spreads to other African coastal areas.Photo: IRIN/Daniel HaydukAfrica Renewallast_img read more