Pereira signs new four-year contract at Man Utd

first_imgManchester United midfielder Andreas Pereira has put pen to paper on a new four-year contract, with the option to extend his stay a further year.The 23-year-old rose through the ranks at Old Trafford as a youth player and graduated to the senior squad in 2014, before being sent out for loan spells at both Granada and Valencia in later seasons.The Brazil international managed to make 15 Premier League appearances for the Red Devils last season, contributing one goal and one assist. Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? Ox-rated! Dream night in Genk for Liverpool ace after injury nightmare Pereira is prepared to stay and fight for a place in Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s starting XI and already has his sights set on making an impact in the 2019-20 campaign.“I have spent so long in Manchester that I now regard the city and the club as my home and I’m extremely happy to continue my career here,” he told the club’s official website. “The manager has shown great faith in me and I can’t wait to get this campaign started under him. “We know that we all have to work hard and that started on day one of pre-season. I will be doing everything I can to help us perform the way we need to, this season and beyond. I also want to thank my family for the trust they have in me and God for the opportunity he has given me.”✍️ @AndrinhoPereira has put pen to paper on a new #MUFC deal 👍— Manchester United (@ManUtd) July 5, 2019Solskjaer also expressed his delight after the announcement was made on Friday afternoon, praising Pereira for his professionalism behind the scenes and energy on the pitch.“Andreas is another player brought through our Academy that understands what it means to play for Manchester United,” the Norwegian began.”He came from another country but quickly understood the values of playing for this club and doesn’t take it for granted.”Andreas has become an important member of the squad with his energy and hard work in midfield. He works non-stop every day in training, has a great character and knows what he has to do to continue his development here. We all look forward to working with him in the season ahead.”Pereira has been joined in committing his future to United by defender Axel Tuanzebe, who has signed a new three-year contract of his own at the Red Devils.Tuanzebe spent last season on loan with Aston Villa, playing a key role in their promotion to the Premier League, and has been tipped by some to challenge for a first team spot at Old Trafford.Axel Tuanzebe Aston Villa 2018-19“I have grown up at Manchester United and it has always been a big part of my life and my family’s life,” he said upon the announcement. “I appreciate the trust that the club has in me and I want to repay that with my performances on the pitch. “I know I have a lot of hard work and learning ahead of me but the experience I gained throughout last season puts me in good stead for the future ahead. I am determined to give everything and show everyone the player that I can be.”The Red Devils finished a disappointing sixth in the Premier League last term, missing out on qualification for the Champions League.In addition to tying Marcus Rashford and Pereira down to new deals, Solskjaer has been busy in the transfer market, bringing in Welsh winger Daniel James from Swansea and Crystal Palace defender Aaron Wan-Bissaka for a combined total of £65m ($82m).United have also reportedly seen a lucrative bid for Leicester centre-back Harry Maguire turned down, amid ongoing links to a number of top European players. Check out Goal’s Premier League 2019-20 fantasy football podcast for game tips, debate and rivalries.last_img read more

End of the line Man loses leg to superbug after routine knee

“It’s like a row of soldiers. You knock one infection down but then another one pops up. You go home and you feel okay but then it’s all hiding there underneath the skin.“It starts off as a little pimple or a red spot and then the skin turns black and gets swollen and incredibly painful,” he says. She predicted a future “where the types of intervention we routinely deliver today, such as caesarean sections, chemotherapy and hip replacements become extremely dangerous… due to drug resistant infections”. Officials estimate that at the current rate, 10 million people a year will die worldwide by 2050 because of the rise of superbugs. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. What Mr Tilley has gone through is still rare, says Dr Williams, but resistant infections are not.“The numbers are going up and up. There’s a straight correlation between the number of antibiotics we use and the number of resistant infections,” he says.Mr Tilley underwent the amputation in November and nearly two months later his stump is healing well and he is looking forward to having a prosthesis fitted in the next few months. Paradoxically, he says he will be more mobile without his leg – he has spent much of the last six years using sticks and crutches to get about and has been heavily reliant on his wife, Andrea. He says adjusting to life as an amputee will be hard but once he gets the hang of his prosthesis he hopes to be back to his previous, active self. The pain of the infection was the worst thing, said Mr Tilley.  It was so intense during a walking holiday in Spain he considered throwing himself off a mountain path. In the end he opted to have his leg amputated. “Between the microbiologist and the surgeon you could see they were fighting their way through this. They didn’t know what to do with me. There are no antibiotics for this – this is the end of the line,” he said. John Williams, an infectious diseases consultant at James Cook Hospital in Middlesbrough, said Mr Tilley had various resistant infections over the years.“If you look at the figures on knee replacements about two per cent become infected – it’s a bit higher for the second knee and a bit higher for the third knee.“The more operations a patient has there is less and less bone and soft tissue for the surgeon to work with so the replacements become that much more difficult,” he said.  Protect yourself and your family by learning more about Global Health Security  A British man has had his leg amputated after contracting a superbug infection following what should have been a routine knee replacement.He is one of a growing number of NHS patients for whom common operations are going horribly wrong because of the rise of antibiotic resistance.Paul Tilley, 68, a former catering manager from Dalton in North Yorkshire, had his right leg removed before Christmas.He contracted the bug after a simple knee replacement. Doctors battled to fight the infection over the course of six years and a series of follow-up operations but without success.“The doctors don’t tell you you need a leg amputation – you have to take the decision yourself. But after six years of pain and not being able to live my life it was the only choice,” he says.  Mr Tilley is one of a growing number of NHS patients to have fallen victim to the epidemic of antibiotic resistance that has been building over the last few years.Data suggests there are at least 2000 superbug-related deaths in the UK each year, many linked to common but invasive operations such as hip and knee replacements.Professor Dame Sally Davies, the Chief Medical Officer for England, warned in The Telegraph last year of a dark future for modern medicine unless the blight of antibiotic resistance could be tackled. “When bone becomes infected you need to get high concentrations of antibiotics into it and not all oral antibiotics achieve that. And if you have a resistant organism it becomes harder because you have a limited number of options. The infections are treatable but you don’t have as many choices and you end up relying on drugs from the 1950s and 60s,” he says. Mr Tilley problems began almost as soon as his knee was replaced.“Within a matter of days I was in the most tremendous pain. I was shaking and vomiting. The nurses had to call the surgeon out in the middle of the night because they didn’t know what to do with me,” he said.His medical notes show a series of infections set in, including the superbugs meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Enterobacter cloacae.  He received a wide range of antibiotics and endured three follow-up knee replacements but the infections could not be killed off. Surgeons even tried an artificial knee coated in silver, a metal known for its anti-bacterial properties. Mr Tilley said last week he had never heard of superbugs or antibiotic resistance before his first operation. Now he has become an expert, losing track of the the number of different antibiotics he has taken orally and by drip over the last few years. Paul Tilley contracted the bug after a simple knee replacement Paul Tilley contracted the bug after a simple knee replacementCredit:Charlotte Graham/The Telegraph read more