Community Feedin Tariff Program Announces Sixth Round of Successful Applicants

first_img the Municipality of the District of Guysborough Fundy Tidal Inc. Wind4All Communities Chebucto Terence Bay Wind Project Colchester-Cumberland Windfield Watts Wind Scotian Wind Inc. Affinity Renewables the Municipality of the District of Shelburne Kwilmu’kw Maw-klusuaqn Next steps for applicants include securing financing, completing a grid-impact study and obtaining the required federal and provincial environmental assessments and approvals. “We are very pleased with the collaborative approaches being taken by our applicants,” said Energy Minister Charlie Parker. “Once constructed, these projects will generate and distribute clean, green power close to home, providing economic development opportunities in the communities they serve.” The Community Feed-in Tariff (COMFIT) concept was introduced in the 2010 Renewable Electricity Plan to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, provide a secure supply of clean energy at stable prices and create jobs. The program began accepting applications in September 2011. Almost 100 locally based proposals have been received from more than 20 community groups for this unique, made-in-Nova Scotia initiative to encourage community participation in renewable energy projects. “The COMFIT program is an innovative way for the province to help communities move away from their dependence on coal-generated electricity,” said Terry Norman, president of the Chebucto Terence Bay Wind Project. “We’re delighted that our project has been approved and we look forward to starting the next phase of the process right away.” The Community Feed-in Tariff allows eligible groups to receive an established price per kilowatt hour (kWh) for projects producing electricity from certain renewable resources. Rates were established by the Utility and Review Board in September. Projects can include wind, biomass, in-stream tidal and run-of-the-river hydroelectric developments. Eligible groups include municipalities, First Nations, co-operatives, universities and not-for-profit groups. The COMFIT program will help the province reach its renewable electricity targets of 25 per cent renewable electricity by 2015 and 40 per cent by 2020. The province expects 100 megawatts of electricity to be produced through the COMFIT program. For more information on the program visit www.nsrenewables.ca. Fourteen communities from across Nova Scotia are closer to enjoying the benefits of clean, green renewable electricity generated in their own backyards as the province announced the next round of approved Community Feed-In Tariff (COMFIT) projects in Guysborough today, April 16. The approvals, granted since March 30, are: last_img read more

Ban Kimoon sends UN legal chief to Lebanon to help break impasse

13 April 2007Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said today he is dispatching the United Nations legal chief to Lebanon on Monday to help the Government and the country’s other political leaders to end their political impasse and set up a special tribunal as soon as possible to try the suspected killers of former prime minister Rafik Hariri. Nicholas Michel, the Under-Secretary-General for Legal Affairs, will “offer his legal assistance… to help their constitutional procedures,” Mr. Ban told reporters at UN Headquarters in New York, referring to the parliamentary ratification necessary for the tribunal to enter into force. Mr. Ban said he hoped that Mr. Michel’s trip would help to “clarify all concerns or apprehensions” that might exist about the tribunal. In February, on behalf of the UN, Mr. Michel signed the agreement with Lebanon to set up the tribunal, but the country’s parliamentary forces have been deadlocked and there has been no vote so far on the tribunal agreement. The planned special tribunal in Lebanon will be of “an international character” to deal with the assassination of Mr. Hariri, who was killed along with 22 others in a massive car bombing in downtown Beirut in February 2005. Once it is formally established, it will be up to the tribunal to determine whether other political killings in Lebanon since October 2004 were connected to Mr. Hariri’s assassination and could therefore be dealt with by the tribunal. Mr. Michel told journalists today that his aim during the visit would be to “help the Lebanese parties to talk to each other and to find common ground so that the institutional process can be promoted towards ratification of the agreement.” He stressed that the UN had never tried to impose such a tribunal on the Lebanese, but had responded to an initial request from the country’s authorities for such a court. “So I work in that spirit, in the spirit of an assistance to be brought to the Lebanese authorities, in the spirit of a national dialogue, reconciliation, mutual understanding towards the establishment of the tribunal.” In April 2004 the Security Council set up the International Independent Investigation Commission (IIIC) after an earlier UN mission found that Lebanon’s own inquiry into the Hariri assassination was seriously flawed and that Syria was primarily responsible for the political tensions that preceded the attack. Its mandate runs out next year. Serge Brammertz, the current head of the IIIC, told the Council last September that evidence obtained so far suggests that a young, male suicide bomber, probably non-Lebanese, detonated up to 1,800 kilograms of explosives inside a van to assassinate Mr. Hariri. read more

As carbon dioxide levels hit 15 million year high UN urges action

“It is deeply disturbing to learn that global levels of 400 parts per million have now been reached in September for the first time,” said Robert Glasser, the Secretary-General’s Special Representative for Disaster Risk Reduction, in a press release yesterday. “The last time CO2 levels were this high was 15 to 20 million years ago,” he added.According to Mr. Glasser, the lowest levels are traditionally recorded September, which translates to the unlikelihood of seeing levels below 400 parts per million for the foreseeable future. “We know that the safe level is well below this,” he continued. “It also means that we are systematically raising levels of disaster risk for future generations and we can expect more severe weather events in the years ahead. Climate disasters already account for 90 per cent of all devastations caused by natural hazards – potentially catastrophic, especially for low and middle-income countries that contribute little to greenhouse gas emissions but have huge populations exposed to drought, floods and storms. “Much more vigorous action is necessary for a reasonable chance of limiting global warming to 2 degrees C while the Paris Agreement recognizes that limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees C rather than 2 degrees C would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change,” the Special Representative concluded.UNISDR serves as the focal point for disaster reduction coordination between the UN and regional organizations. Its work is applied to climate change adaptation; building disaster-resilient cities, schools and hospitals; and strengthening the international system for DRR. read more