BBC decorated canteen with huge Bake Off images before it lost show

first_imgWe literally JUST redecorated the canteen at the BBC 😒 #GBBO pic.twitter.com/sWWP3EKWzE— Julia Macfarlane (@juliamacfarlane) September 12, 2016 You beat me to it @juliamacfarlane! A decorating disaster. Could there be a programme in that? The Great British Paint Off?— ritula shah (@ritula) September 12, 2016 It is enough to leave a bitter taste in the mouth. Hours after the BBC lost the rights to its most successful show, The Great British Bake Off, the corporation revealed it had only  just redecorated the canteen with images promoting the programme.According to one BBC employee, large images of Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry, the baking show’s judges, had only just been put up on the walls of the staff canteen.BBC producer and reporter Julia Macfarlane tweeted: “We literally JUST redecorated the canteen at the BBC” with an unimpressed emoji.Accompanying the tweet is an image of the large pictures in the canteen. Berry is quoted saying: “The terror of a soggy bottom has been keeping me up all night.”Hollywood is illustrated with another quote from the show: “Keep your biscuits erect, you’ve got four hours to do so.” A BBC spokesman told The Telegraph: “We have pictures of many much-loved BBC stars in our buildings.”Channel 4 poached the show from the BBC after the corporation refused to pay £25 million a year to hold on to it.The company behind the baking show, Love Productions, announced on Monday afternoon that it would withdraw the programme from the BBC at the end of the current series, having failed to seal a new deal after “more than a year of exhaustive negotiations”.Channel 4 then announced it had a three-year deal with the production company, and will be broadcasting the show after the current series. Ritula Shah, another BBC member of staff, joked they could begin a “Great British Paint Off”. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. It is unclear whether the BBC will keep the decorations up, or whether they will have to re-decorate the canteen after the show is moved to Channel 4.Ms Macfarlane suggested the company “may have to wallpaper over it”. @ritula They’re going to have to wallpaper over it surely. How awkward!— Julia Macfarlane (@juliamacfarlane) September 12, 2016 Love is understood to have rejected bigger offers from both Netflix and ITV.However, the BBC’s canteen images may remain relevant – as it is unclear whether the presenters of the BBC show will move to Channel 4.Mary Berry and Paul Hollywood, as well as hosts Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc, have all previously expressed a desire to stay with the BBC.Perkins used her Twitter profile to share a BBC statement in which the corporation said that Bake Off was a “quintessentially BBC programme”.last_img read more

Theresa May is preparing to abandon plans for a British Bill of

first_imgTheresa May is preparing to abandon plans for a British Bill of Rights after Britain leaves the European Union, Government sources have suggested.Ministers have confirmed that the Government’s plans to scrap the Human Rights Act have been shelved until after Brexit.However sources told The Daily Telegraph that the plans may now be abandoned entirely because Brexit will significantly strengthen the sovereignty of British courts.They also highlighted the Brexit judgement by the Supreme Court earlier this week which made clear that Britain will no longer be subject to European Court of Justice rulings after Brexit. He said: “If they dropped the whole thing it would be deeply disappointing because the problem is there and it would not go away.”The European Court of Human Rights is not an EU institution and we will still be subject to its jurisdiction after we leave the EU. We can get Brexit out of the way then come back to think about it again.”Mrs May, who served as Home Secretary from 2010 to 2016, spoke in the past of her desire to quit the ECHR, which frustrated her plans to extradite the hate preacher Abu Qatada.In April, Mrs May said: “The ECHR can bind the hands of Parliament, adds nothing to our prosperity, makes us less secure by preventing the deportation of dangerous foreign nationals, and does nothing to change the attitudes of governments like Russia’s when it comes to human rights.”However during her leadership campaign Mrs May said pulling out of the ECHR was not something she could pursue in this Parliament because of the Conservative’s slim majority.The details of the Bill of Rights plans were drawn up by Michael Gove, the former justice secretary, who was sacked as part of Mrs May’s summer reshuffle. “But does my Right Honourable and Learned Friend agree that leaving the European Union and freeing the United Kingdom from the bonds of the charter of fundamental rights must be their top priority?”Sir Oliver replied: “I do agree with that. I think it important for us to sort out the EU side of matters, and the exit from the EU, before we return to that subject.”His comments suggest that a decision on whether to introduce a British Bill of Rights will not be made until after the General Election in 2020.However government sources said it is now unlikely to happen at all amid concerns that Mrs May could face a rebellion by Conservative MPs over the issue.Martin Howe QC, who has advised the Conservatives on plans to scrap the human rights act, said he was “deeply disappointed” by the suggestion that they could be dropped. Mrs May has also already pledged to end legal witch hunts against British soldiers by using existing exemptions to suspend human rights laws on the battlefield.David Cameron, the former Prime Minister, had vowed to scrap the human rights act and replace it with a British bill of rights to stop it being exploited by foreign criminals, terrorists and others.However Sir Oliver Heald, a justice minister, disclosed earlier this week that plans to scrap the human rights act – which were part of the Conservative manifesto – will be delayed until after Brexit.David Nuttall, a Conservative MP, asked Sir Oliver in the Commons: “It is of course right that our manifesto commitment to replace the Human Rights Act remains on the Government’s agenda. I think it important for us to sort out the EU side of matters, and the exit from the EU, before we return to that subjectSir Oliver Heald, a justice ministercenter_img David Cameron, the former Prime Minister, had vowed to scrap the human rights act and replace it with a British bill of rights to stop it being exploited by foreign criminals, terrorists and othersCredit:REUTERS/UK Parliament  David Cameron, the former Prime Minister, had vowed to scrap the human rights act and replace it with a British bill of rights to stop it being exploited by foreign criminals, terrorists and others Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more