Greenpeace says Resolute Forests defamation lawsuit is an attempt to silence critics

THUNDER BAY, Ont. — Greepeace has filed court documents saying a lawsuit against it is an attempt to silence its criticism of a forestry company’s harvesting practices.[np_storybar title=”How Greenpeace landed itself in serious legal trouble with its campaign against a forestry company” link=”https://business.financialpost.com/2014/07/16/greenpeace-resolute/”%5DTerence Corcoran: Interfering with economic relations is a far more serious bit of wrongdoing under Canadian tort law. Greenpeace lost its first attempt to get the economic relations part of the case removed, claiming there was lack of evidence in Resolute Forest’s claims. Keep reading. [/np_storybar]“Greenpeace states that the Plaintiffs’ claims for defamation and interference with economic relations, have no merit and in fact are being made to harass, intimidate and silence Greenpeace,” the environmental group said in a statement of defence filed Thursday.The papers were filed in response to a defamation suit brought against it last year by Montreal-based Resolute Forest Products.Resolute brought the case in 2013 after Greenpeace accused it of building roads and cutting trees in regions of Quebec it had promised it would stay out of under the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement, an agreement on forest preservation and harvesting signed by environmental groups and Canada’s main forestry companies.Greenpeace later retracted allegations it had made about road-building, but Resolute accuses the group of repeating those charges nonetheless.Resolute also accuses Greenpeace of falsely claiming it had mishandled workers’ pensions, and that the group mischaracterized the amount of recycled fibre in Resolute products.Those claims were circulated to Resolute’s customers and at its annual general meeting. The company alleges they hurt its reputation and cost it a coveted eco-friendly certification.The full scope of the damage is not yet known by Resolute“The full scope of the damage is not yet known by Resolute,” says the statement of claim, which was also laid against two individual Greenpeace members. The lawsuit asks for $7 million in damages.Resolute has also filed a similar lawsuit against an environmental auditing firm claiming its draft report helped lead to the company losing its Forest Stewardship Council approved status. The company claims the two auditors made errors and were biased against it.The report has not been released, pending the lawsuit. Resolute is requesting a new audit be conducted.“The lawsuits against Greenpeace and Rainforest Alliance meet the classic profile of a SLAPP suit (strategic lawsuit against public participation) because they have been brought to silence criticism of the company’s conduct,” said the Greenpeace documents.Greenpeace accused Resolute of filing the lawsuit in Ontario instead of their Quebec headquarters because that province has legislation against such litigation. Greenpeace says Resolute has lobbied heavily against introducing such a law in Ontario.It denies Resolute’s claims that it sought to damage the company and calls its statements fair comment.“Greenpeace’s objective has never been to cause harm to Resolute Forest Products, but rather to promote an explicit vision for the future of the boreal forest which includes Resolute Forest Products and other forest companies playing an important role as part of a diversified forest economy,” says its statement. — By Bob Weber in Edmonton read more

Alberta First Nations chief to be honoured for 30 years of business

by 660 NEWS Staff Posted Nov 20, 2016 3:08 pm MDT Photo: Canadian Council of Aboriginal Business Alberta First Nations chief to be honoured for 30 years of business leadership AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Business leaders from across Canada will be in Calgary celebrating the successes of an Alberta First Nations chief. Jim Boucher, who is the chief of the Fort McKay First Nation in northern Alberta, will be honoured on Wednesday evening at the Aboriginal Connections Reception. J.P. Gladu, president and CEO of the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business, said Boucher has spent the past 30 years building strong partnerships between Fort McKay, industry and government. Gladu said in the early days, the First Nation was opposed to development for fears it would be negatively impacted, but shifted when members realized there were opportunities to work with industry to develop their economy, and that they could have a say in how and where the development happened. He said Boucher’s ability to build relationships has led to the economic and social success of the First Nation. “At the end of the day, it gets down to relationships,” Gladu said. “We need to treat relationships like we treat our marriages in that if we’re going to have a healthy marriage; we have to have a healthy understanding of each other.”“We have to understand where the value is in the relationship, and we have to communicate regularly. We both have to benefit from the relationship, and we both have to be at the table when we make decisions.”Gladu added, Boucher took time and effort to build these types of relationships, and the companies Fort McKay works with have reciprocated, which is why the community is such a success story. read more

Dominique StraussKahn is not happy with a film based on his sex

first_imgDOMINIQUE STRAUSS-KAHN is to file suit for defamation over a US movie inspired by the sex scandal that brought down the former IMF chief, his lawyer confirmed today.Abel Ferrara’s Welcome to New York stars Gerard Depardieu as a man called Georges Devereaux with striking similarities to “DSK” – whose alleged 2011 sexual assault on a New York hotel maid shook the world.Speaking on Europe 1 radio, Strauss-Kahn’s lawyer Jean Veil said his client would in the coming days “file suit for defamation over the accusations of rape and the insinuations made all throughout the movie”.He said Strauss-Kahn has been cleared of all charges in the case, and was “sickened and frightened by this film”, which premiered at the Cannes film festival on Saturday.Veil described the film as “a piece of shit, dogshit”, and echoed a charge by Strauss-Kahn’s ex-wife Anne Sinclair that aspects of it were “anti-Semitic”.The start of Ferrara’s film states that it is inspired by a court case but it has been widely seen as a fictionalised account of the downfall of DSK.Strauss-Kahn was arrested in May 2011 in New York and forced to live under house arrest for weeks after posting $1 million bail.Criminal charges were eventually dropped and Strauss-Kahn settled a civil suit brought by the maid by paying her undisclosed damages, which reportedly exceeded $1.5 million.Sinclair has accused the movie of portraying her in an anti-Jewish way, through the character of Devereaux’s wife Simone played by Jacqueline Bisset.In the film, Simone is a rich woman who inherited a fortune amassed during World War II and helps the Israeli state financially.Writing in the French Huffington Post, which she edits, Sinclair accused the authors and producers of the film of projecting their “fantasies about money and Jews”, notably in a scene in which Devereaux tells Simone, “Everyone knows what your family did during the war.”“My grandfather (famous art dealer Paul Rosenberg) had to escape from the Nazis and was stripped of his French nationality by the Vichy government,” Sinclair said added, referring to the wartime French regime that collaborated with the Germans.Sinclair said however she would not resort to legal action over what she described as “dirt”.Ferrara refuted the allegations on Sunday, telling AFP he is not “anti-Semitic”.“I hope not. I was brought up by Jewish women,” he said.- © AFP, 2012“Leave me alone!”: Strauss-Kahn says he is facing “media assault”Fizzy drink named after DSK to go on sale in Francelast_img read more